Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Review of goods clearance fees

Acting Comptroller of Customs Bill Perry says a review of Customs fees for clearing imported and exported goods is long overdue.

“Customs last reviewed its fees in 2006 and since then, the type and volume of goods crossing the border has changed significantly.”

“Customs is responding to increased risks and new ways of smuggling illicit drugs in goods, and the proposed fees support its capability to protect New Zealanders from those risks.”

“The considerable growth in the volume of lower value goods being imported and exported by air, means that Customs needs to take a closer look at how it recovers the costs incurred clearing goods.”

“A review of Customs goods clearance fees has highlighted the need to update charges to reflect where the costs of identifying risks in sea and air cargo now lie.”

“There is now greater transparency around how Customs costs its activities and applies its charges.”

“The proposed fees reflect the actual costs Customs incurs clearing goods, and costs are now shared more fairly - some fees will increase and some will reduce. On this basis, most export charges will reduce.”

“The key principle underpinning the review is equity - those who generate need for and/or benefit from Customs activities should pay for them.”

Public consultation will run until 5pm 30 August 2019. Detailed information about the costs of Customs goods clearance activities and proposed changes to fees can be found by visiting www.customs.govt.nz/fees-review.

“I urge affected importers, exporters and businesses to engage in the consultation process to enable Customs to fully understand the implications of its proposals and develop the right charges,” Bill Perry says.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Primary Sector Council Report: Vision To Unite The Primary Sector Launched

Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor has welcomed the release of a bold new vision for the country’s vital food and fibre sector. More>>

ALSO:

Crown Accounts: Treasury HYEFU Sees Deficit Then Rising Surpluses

An operating balance before gains and losses deficit of $0.9 billion is forecast in the current year, before returning to a small surplus in 2020/21 which then grows to reach $5.9 billion (1.5% of GDP) in 2023/24. More>>

ALSO:

Fuels Rushing In: Govt "Ready To Act" On Petrol Market Report

The Government will now take the Commerce Commission’s recommendations to Cabinet...
• A more transparent wholesale pricing regime • Greater contractual freedoms and fairer terms • Introducing an enforceable industry code of conduct • Improve transparency of premium grade fuel pricing... More>>

ALSO:

Reserve Bank Capital Review Decision: Increased Bank Capital Requirements

Governor Adrian Orr said the decisions to increase capital requirements are about making the banking system safer for all New Zealanders, and will ensure bank owners have a meaningful stake in their businesses. More>>

ALSO: