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Prominent Australian Labour Economist To Visit NZ

Judith Sloan, leading Australian labour market economist and professor of Labour Studies at the Flinders University of South Australia, will visit New Zealand in September as a guest of the New Zealand Business Roundtable (NZBR).

Professor Sloan will deliver the 1999 Sir Ronald Trotter Lecture to be held at Te Papa on 21 September. In her lecture Ideas about labour markets: the last 100 years and the 21st Century, Professor Sloan will explore new ways of looking at the labour market and examine the intersection between industrial relations and economics.

Professor Sloan was an early advocate of labour market deregulation in Australia. She has produced a wide range of analysis on labour markets and industrial relations as director of the National Institute of Labour Studies (NILS), a leading economic research centre. She holds a Master of Arts degree in economics from the University of Melbourne and a Master of Science degree in economics from the London School of Economics.

Professor Sloan is currently a commissioner of the Productivity Commission, the Australian government's principal microeconomic research agency. She has recently overseen a Commission inquiry into the impact of competition policy on rural and regional Australia.

Professor Sloan is a regular radio and television commentator and has been a weekly columnist in the Australian Financial Review and The Australian. She has written extensively on labour market and industrial relations matters.

She has substantial experience on public company boards and is currently a director of Santos Limited, Australia's largest on-shore oil and gas company, and Mayne Nickless Limited, a health care and logistics company, and is chair of SGIC Holdings Limited, one of the leading general insurers in South Australia. She was appointed to the board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in August 1999.

ENDS....

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