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More Strikes and More Conflict say Unions - EF

We Just Really Really Want More Strikes And More Conflict Say Unions

The new leadership of the CTU are making their post election plans clear – they want more strikes and conflict in the nation’s workplaces. This will cost jobs and be bad for everyone except the actual union organizations themselves, Employers’ Federation CEO Steve Marshall said today.

This follows reports from the CTUs conference last weekend.

“New Zealanders should make no mistake; the Unions are gearing up to disrupt the country. The Labour and Alliance Parties industrial relations policies already promise to give massive new powers to unions, while taking them away from individual workers. It means that unions will be able to cause much more disruption and breakdown the good communication and local cooperation taking place in New Zealand workplaces right now.

“But these promises don’t seem enough for them. The unions want even more.

“In a taste of things to come, the CTU, as well as calling for legalized secondary strikes – something Labour have promised will not happen - are now seeking the right to strike over social and economic issues.

This is an amazing nerve from a group that 82.3% of workers choose not to have any involvement with.

‘It does not bode well. If the unions get their way, workers and their families, along with their employers, will have to pay for the whim of unions who decide to take workers on strike because of, say, students having to pay back money they have borrowed, or maybe because they disagree with the Treaty Claims process. Disruption from unions just to flex their muscles will cost jobs and cause misery.

“In a survey of 1000 New Zealanders by AC Nielsen, 71% of New Zealanders recognized that strike action hurt the families of striking workers the most.

“Obviously the Trade Union movement are already planning their post election position as part of a Labour Alliance coalition,” Mr. Marshall concluded.


ends

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