Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Little Gold Cowboy to screen in Venice Festival

Little Gold Cowboy to screen in Venice Film Festival

Little Gold Cowboy, a short film by Wellington filmmaker Michael Reihana, has been selected to screen in the 59th Mostra Venice International Film Festival. In the meantime, it will feature in the Homegrown section of the 2002 New Zealand International Film Festival, screening at the Paramount in Wellington on Sunday, 4 August.

Little Gold Cowboy, a 12-minute film about a cowboy who holds his heart in a plastic bag protected by a goldfish while on a metaphorical search for true love, also screened in the recent Wellington Fringe Short Film Festival.

The film was funded by the Screen Innovation Production Fund, a partnership between Creative New Zealand and the New Zealand Film Commission, and produced by Mozaic Pictures.

Reihana’s first directing achievement will be seen alongside films from throughout Europe and Asia in an experimental section of the Venice Film Festival entitled New Territories.

Reihana says the film is a collaboration of all the crew and is delighted that several of its members will be travelling to Italy to support the screening. Director/writer Michael Reihana, producers Tara Landry and Melanie Webber, film editor Daniel Monaghan, key grip Ollie Harris and gaffer Martyn Williams will all fly from New Zealand to Venice in a few weeks.

Joining them there will be the Little Gold Cowboy, currently residing in Bulgaria, and the Italian mechanic Andrea Filippini, now back in his native Italy.

“We’d like to thank Wellington and middle-town New Zealand for all the help and effort they have put into our film, and we look forward to representing the new styles of Kiwiana filmmaking,” Reihana says.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: Roddy Doyle's Grim and Gritty Rosie

Although it was completed over two years ago, Roddy Doyle's first original screenplay in over eighteen years has only just arrived in New Zealand. It's been well worth the wait. More>>

Simon Nathan: No Ordinary In-Laws

The title of this short memoir by Keith Ovenden is misleading – it would be better called “Bill, Shirley and me” as it is an account of Ovenden’s memories of his parents-in-law, Bill Sutch and Shirley Smith. His presence is pervasive through the book. All three participants are (or were) eloquent, strongly-opinionated intellectuals who have made significant contributions to different aspects of New Zealand life. Their interactions were often complex and difficult... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland