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Jungle Paintings at bartley nees gallery


Jungle Paintings at bartley nees gallery

In his third solo exhibition at Bartley Nees Gallery, Auckland artist Graham Fletcher explores the idea of the jungle as an overgrown place of bewildering complexity and confusion. The line drawn figures that populate the Jungle Paintings are overlaid on top of each other, creating dense vine-like formations. The resulting entangled relationship enacts a kind of Darwinian struggle for survival. The spotted animal print surfaces of the works are a continuation of the camouflage aesthetic that has characterised Fletcher's recent series of paintings including Quarantine, Bad Medicine, Virgin and King of the Wood.

Fletcher has recently been noted as an artist of great potential by art commentator John Daly-Peoples in a National Business Review article discussing collecting art. His successful exhibition, Bad Medicine which was on at Bartley Nees Gallery last year received great reviews and this latest exhibition promises to offer the viewer a further chance to engage with the accomplished painterly language that characterises Fletcher's work:

"I lure or attract the viewer to my work through my use of colour, through the tactility of my painterly surfaces and through the attraction of my graphic imagery, all of which is designed to disguise or veil the larger issues lying just below the surface."

Please find attached an image of Jungle Painting 5, 2002, enamel on canvas.

If you would like any further information about the exhibition or images of the paintings please don't hesitate to contact Alison Bartley on 801 9795 or refer to our website http://www.bartleyneesgallery.co.nz/exhibitions.asp?id=new.

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