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Science And Art Collide In New Photo Exhibition

MEDIA RELEASE

27 April 2004

Science And Art Collide In New Photographic Exhibition


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CAPTION: An Angels Wing?
Underwater View Of Silica Streamer Deposits

By Duncan Graham, geothermal scientist, Geological and Nuclear Sciences (GNS)
Technology used: digital camera and a glass-bottomed bucket
Size: field of view approx. 1 metre
Location: in a wastewater drain at the Wairakei Power Station, near Taupo
These deposits form when silica dissolved in the water precipitates on micro-organisms shaped like long filaments. As the micro-organisms grow and multiply, they build up thick deposits of silica which trail out in the surrounding water currents.

A major national exhibition featuring inspiring images from three science organisations is to be launched in Wellington today.

Unseen Worlds – New Dimensions explores the shared ground between art and science, and is designed to give New Zealanders an opportunity to see the amazing images that scientists create in the course of their everyday work.

The collection of 40 large-format photographs was sourced from routine research work carried out by scientists at Geological and Nuclear Sciences (GNS), the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), and the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research.

The photographs were selected for their strong visual impact by a team of exhibition and photographic specialists, who had over 140 images to choose from. Those that made the final exhibition included images drawn from within the human body, deepsea marine species, internal structures within microfossils from 60 million years ago through to structural patterns within stressed ice in Antarctica.

Unseen Worlds – New Dimensions also features the people behind the processes (the scientists and technicians), presented on video monitors, talking to audiences about their work. Banners featuring patterns lifted from the photographs are also part of the touring package.

The exhibition will be on the road for two years, starting with a three-month showing at Auckland War Memorial Museum from early July 2004.

Wellington audiences can visit the exhibition during its extended summer season (October 2004 to March 2005) at Museum of Wellington City and Sea. Other venues include: Southland Museum of Art & History (Invercargill), the International Science Festival (Dunedin), and Te Manawa, Palmerston North.

ENDS

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