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Daffodil sales increasing year-on-year


Media release


27 August 2009


Daffodil sales increasing year-on-year

Sales of domestically-grown daffodils have grown massively in recent years, largely thanks to the Cancer Society of New Zealand’s annual fundraising campaign.

Local daffodil grower, Graham Phillips, says sales have increased by 200% in the last 30 years but the annual Daffodil Day fundraiser has really boosted interest in the yellow flower in the past decade.

Graham, who is a partner at Clandon Daffodils, says “everyone now recognises daffodils as a symbol of the Cancer Society but they are also such a wonderfully inexpensive and mood-lifting flower.”

Clandon Daffodils grows the popular flowers for the domestic market and also supplies them to the Waikato-Bay of Plenty Cancer Society for Daffodil Day.

Cancer Society of New Zealand health promotions manager, Dr Jan Pearson, says daffodils are also a sign of hope and new life.

“Daffodils lift people’s moods. They come with warmer days and longer daylight hours leading into summer. For many people they are a sign that they have made it through winter and, survived tragedy, and daffodils represent a symbol of hope,” says Jan.

Scent Floral Boutique owner, Ingrid Pritchard, directs her customers to daffodils at this time of year because they come in many varieties and are very affordable.

“Daffodils are bright, cheery and great for adding volume to bouquets.”

Daffodil Day is Friday 28 August 2009. There are many commercial daffodil growers throughout the country. Daffodils can retail in supermarkets for approximately $2.50-$4 per bunch.

Ends…/

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