Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Leading NZ artist to exhibit at the Wai, Queenstown

                                           Media release – December 20, 2010

             Leading NZ artist to stage exhibition at the Wai in Queenstown

Leading New Zealand artist Lisa Wisse of Christchurch will next week open a special exhibition of dedicated works at the Wai on Steamer wharf in Queenstown.

The exclusive exhibition which opens on Christmas Eve will run until the end of February. Wisse is regarded as one of the top contemporary Kiwi artists whose works are highly sought-after.

She has also just opened an exhibition at the Arthouse in Sydney using elements of the land, fertile vineyards, flowing foothills, sculptured urns moulded from the clay of the earth.

``I included cracks and scarred land patterns, representing the Christchurch earthquake of September 4 which I lived through. The aftershocks instilled fear on a daily basis,’’ Wisse said today.

``My life has changed irreversibly since September and I have portrayed the survival process by the inclusion of fragments of beauty found in each piece, a touch of luminous gold, the perfect skeleton of a fallen leaf -always seeing beauty and positivity.’’                                                

The 7.1 earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, on September 4 is expected to cost the country up to $6 billion.

Wisse also recently paid tribute to the 29 Pike River coal miners who perished in the NZ mining tragedy with a painting gifted to the West Coast community.

Wisse of Christchurch handed the painting over to Grey district mayor Tony Kokshoorn as a homage to the miners and those affected by the Pike river mining disaster. Wisse said she wanted the painting to be hung publicly as a visual memorial to the tragedy so visitors to Greymouth could pay their respects. She will also produce a special 500 print edition of the original painting with proceeds going to the mining disaster fund.

``I used the symbolic form of a strong, weathered mature tree, silhouetted against the early dawn light to represent your strong fathers, sons and husbands who left early to work deep in the earth on November 19,’’ she said in a note to the miner’s families attached to the painting.

``I have recorded 29 words mentioned by the Pike River chief executive and the mayor to remember, giving strength and solace to not only the families but to the entire nation.’’

The 29 words are: miners, confusion, terror, pain, bravery, families, sons, brothers, fathers, husbands, anger, frustration, fighters, strength, tears, heartbreak, grief, vigil, sorrow, prayers, stoic, friends, tragedy, solidarity, heartwarming, future, love, resilience, memories.

A special edition of 500 high quality prints of her original Pike River 29 painting is being offered to the public to help raise funds for the West Coast mining disaster appeal. Wisse has been overwhelmed with the public response to her painting and had received a flood of requests for a print.

Two months ago gave a painting to US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during the senator’s visit to NZ.  Wisse has been one of New Zealand’s most prolific artists of the last 10 years. She has exhibited her work throughout New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the UK and also has her paintings among private collections in New York, Australia and the UK.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 


Howard Davis: Emerald Fennell's Promising Young Woman'


The Guardian needed not one, but three reviews to do justice to Fennell's unsettling approach, which indicates exactly how ambiguous and controversial its message really is. More>>


Howard Davis: Jill Trevelyan's Rita Angus

Although Angus has become one of Aotearoa’s best-loved painters, the story of her life remained little known and poorly understood before Jill Trevelyan's acclaimed and revelatory biography, which won the Non Fiction Award at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2009, and has now been republished by Te Papa press. More>>

Howard Davis: The Back of the Painting

Painting conservators are the forensic pathologists of the art world. While they cannot bring their subjects back to life, they do provide fascinating insights into the precise circumstances of a painting's creation, its material authenticity, and constructive methodology. More>>


Howard Davis: Black Panthers on the Prowl

A passionate and gripping political drama from Shaka King, this is an informative and instructive tale of human frailty that centers around the charismatic Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton, who was murdered at the age of twenty-one during a police raid. More>>

Howard Davis: Controlling the High Ground

Stephen Johnson's raw and angry film not only poses important questions with scrupulous authenticity, but also provides a timely reminder of the genocidal consequences of casual bigotry and xenophobia. More>>

Howard Davis: Dryzabone - Robert Conolly's The Dry

After the terrible devastation caused by last year’s bushfires, which prompted hundreds of Australians to shelter in the ocean to escape incineration and destroyed uncountable amounts of wildlife, The Dry has been released during a totally different kind of dry spell. More>>


Howard Davis: Hit the Road, Jack - Chloé Zhao's Nomadland

Nomadland is perhaps the ultimately 'road' movie as it follows a group of dispossessed and disenfranchised vagabonds who find a form of communal refuge in camp sites and trailer parks after the economic contraction of 2008. More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland