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Garage Issue 2 Returns

Garage Issue 2 Returns

As part of *Flying Nun Records' *series of digitally re-publishing the * Garage* music fanzine, Issue 2 is now available again as a PDF download.

*Garage #2 *is the hardest to find and physically a little odd as well. Printed in a strangely shaped format, with a great cover featuring hand written lowercase uphill “garage” that somehow emphasises both “garage” and “rage” atop an image of a blurry dark hand playing a left handed guitar. It’s all askew and delightfully unsettling.

And while *Garage #2* was originally hard to read it is less so here. With cover stories on the *Sneaky Feelings *(where it is noted that “Martin tells the history of the band like he should write a book about it” which is what Matthew Bannister does do many years later), *The Puddle* (read about the bands early development) and *The Orange* (and Andrew Broughs pre *Straitjacket Fits* experience).

And there are other good bits too. A rundown on how Dunedin’s Radio One was getting organised in 1985 is timely, a live review of *The Chills** *and for this version editor Richard Langston has also compiled a podcast to accompany as you scroll through the digital pages.

To coincide with their 30th Anniversary, Flying Nun Records is re-publishing all six issues of *Garage*, with a new one out each month for the rest of the year.

*DOWNLOAD THE FREE PDF VERSION OF GARAGE ISSUE 2 (Click the Link) *

*LISTEN TO THE GARAGE #2 PODCAST OVER AT THE FLYING NUN BLOG (Click the Link)*
ends

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