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Court Jesters Find Intermediate Venue

MEDIA RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 19 August 2011

Court Jesters Find Intermediate Venue



Scared Scriptless


Christchurch’s iconic comedy show SCARED SCRIPTLESS will move to a new venue at Heaton Intermediate Normal School Auditorium where New Zealand’s longest-running improvised comedy show will be staged until The Court Theatre’s new venue in Addington, “The Shed” opens at the end of the year.

Audiences have been steady for the show since it returned to Christchurch less than three weeks after the February earthquake, but Court Jesters Manager Kirsty Gillespie is glad that the troupe has found a longer-term venue in which to perform.

The Jesters have seen an explosion of demand for corporate entertainment and are confident that by staying at Heaton until summer, it will make it easier for those seeking light relief to come and enjoy the uniquely interactive comedy experience of SCARED SCRIPTLESS.

“After several months of performing Scriptless in numerous venues around the city,” Gillespie says, “having one location confirmed until the end of the year – particularly one with an excellent stage, seating and facilities - is great for our audiences. The earlier 8pm time slot is an added bonus” SCARED SCRIPTLESS will be staged at Heaton Intermediate theatre (133 Heaton St, Merivale) at 8pm Fridays and Saturdays until the end of the year. Tickets $16 adults and $14 students (with ID). Groups of 10+ $14. Bookings available at 963 0870 or at www.courttheatre.org.nz.

Ends

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