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New Arts Programmes Funded By Creative NZ

New Arts Programmes Funded By Creative NZ

Creative New Zealand has committed funding through two new complementary programmes as it implements a major overhaul of its multi-year funding for the arts.

The funding was made by the Arts Board and Te Waka Toi as the new programmes replace the previous Recurrent Funding, Arts Investment, and Sector Investment programmes.

Over the next three years more than $50 million will be invested in 72 arts organisations, ranging from the Auckland Theatre Company to Dunedin’s Blue Oyster Gallery. In 2012, overall investment in the same organisations will increase by approximately $2 million to $22 million, up from $19.7 million in 2011.

“The majority of funding will be delivered through long term contracts that will give arts organisations security to plan for the future. These forward looking investments give confidence that pivotal art organisations are well placed to respond to contemporary New Zealand,” said Creative New Zealand Chief Executive Stephen Wainwright.

“Investment in Māori and Pacific arts organisations has increased by 20 percent. This will enable organisations like Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust, Tawata Productions and Toi Māori Aotearoa to delight growing audiences for Māori and Pacific work.”

Creative New Zealand is also broadening access to the arts with funding for Arts Access Aotearoa which works to improve access to arts for all New Zealanders, including people with disabilities. For the first time multi-year funding is also being provided to Touch Compass, a contemporary dance company that combines dancers with and without disabilities; and Massive Theatre Company which produces work from the stories of Aucklanders in their teens and early twenties.

“We’re also pleased to support the new New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust which is being funded over two years to deliver a programme of contemporary dance so New Zealanders can see work by some of the country’s best dancers and choreographers.

“In addition to supporting new and emerging arts organisations, Creative New Zealand is also funding those which have a strong record of arts delivery and are key to the arts in this country. The majority of our investment continues to be in the critical network of theatres, contemporary art galleries, orchestras, service organisations, festivals, publishers and chamber music organisations throughout the country,” he said.

Creative New Zealand is offering $500,000 a year in incentive funding for initiatives where organisations are working together, for example to develop and present new New Zealand work or to provide internships for emerging artists and arts practitioners.

Background

The two new funding programmes Arts Leadership Investment (Toi Tōtara Haemata) and the Arts Development Investment (Toi Uru Kahikatea) replace the Recurrent Funding, Arts Investment, and Sector Investment programmes.

Establishing the new programmes was the recommendation from Creative New Zealand’s review of its programme for recurrently funded organisations (RFOs). The RFO review was the last of three funding programme reviews that Creative New Zealand undertook to complete as part of its 2007-2010 strategic plan.

Creative New Zealand’s investment of more than $50 million over the next three years is not its total funding of the arts. Funding from Toi Uru Kahikatea will be available again in 2012 while funding from Toi Tōtara Haemata may be available in 2013 for new or unfilled key roles. In addition to the new programmes, Creative New Zealand is also continuing to offer Arts and Quick Response Grants and the Creative Communities Scheme.

ends

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