Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Kiwis quick to lend a hand

13 August 2012

Kiwis quick to lend a hand

The Rugby World Cup flow on continues down south as over 100 kiwis have opted to volunteer their time to the Junior Track World Championships (JTWC) in Invercargill next week.

Volunteerism was prolific during the recent Rugby World Cup in New Zealand, and seems to have had a lasting effect on many of those who donned the unique turquoise uniform.

“I think the Rugby World Cup last year showed volunteering in a new light for a lot of New Zealanders. So many people had such a great experience in being part of an event and making a contribution to something so great, that they’ve been hooked,” said Cycling Southland CEO Nick Jeffrey.

“A large portion of the 120 volunteers who will assist with the JTWC have scheduled a full week’s annual leave to be part of this event, which is truly amazing.“

Volunteers will be situated all around the event at the Stadium Southland Velodrome; from managing results and starting gates, to accreditation and corporate hosting, and more than 30 medical staff, this world-class event would not be possible without each of their contributions.

“It would be the same anywhere in New Zealand I’m sure, but for Invercargill this is just the way we do things; people want to lend a hand anyway they can,” said Jeffrey.

JTWC volunteer coordinator Cathy Jordan said there is a lot of personal satisfaction that can come from offering your services as an event volunteer.

“I think people often volunteer because they like to be part of a community, and they get to be on the inside of a cool event like this; it has a great social aspect as well,” said Jordan.

“When you see a positive outcome for an event you’ve been a part of, and see everyone enjoying themselves, there’s a certain level of satisfaction that goes with that.”

Track cycling teams from more than 20 different countries will travel to Invercargill for the event, which will take place on August 22-26.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 


Howard Davis: Emerald Fennell's Promising Young Woman'


The Guardian needed not one, but three reviews to do justice to Fennell's unsettling approach, which indicates exactly how ambiguous and controversial its message really is. More>>


Howard Davis: Jill Trevelyan's Rita Angus

Although Angus has become one of Aotearoa’s best-loved painters, the story of her life remained little known and poorly understood before Jill Trevelyan's acclaimed and revelatory biography, which won the Non Fiction Award at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2009, and has now been republished by Te Papa press. More>>

Howard Davis: The Back of the Painting

Painting conservators are the forensic pathologists of the art world. While they cannot bring their subjects back to life, they do provide fascinating insights into the precise circumstances of a painting's creation, its material authenticity, and constructive methodology. More>>


Howard Davis: Black Panthers on the Prowl

A passionate and gripping political drama from Shaka King, this is an informative and instructive tale of human frailty that centers around the charismatic Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton, who was murdered at the age of twenty-one during a police raid. More>>

Howard Davis: Controlling the High Ground

Stephen Johnson's raw and angry film not only poses important questions with scrupulous authenticity, but also provides a timely reminder of the genocidal consequences of casual bigotry and xenophobia. More>>

Howard Davis: Dryzabone - Robert Conolly's The Dry

After the terrible devastation caused by last year’s bushfires, which prompted hundreds of Australians to shelter in the ocean to escape incineration and destroyed uncountable amounts of wildlife, The Dry has been released during a totally different kind of dry spell. More>>


Howard Davis: Hit the Road, Jack - Chloé Zhao's Nomadland

Nomadland is perhaps the ultimately 'road' movie as it follows a group of dispossessed and disenfranchised vagabonds who find a form of communal refuge in camp sites and trailer parks after the economic contraction of 2008. More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland