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Ahuwhenua Trophy Finalists Announced

MEDIA RELEASE
20.03.13

Ahuwhenua Trophy Finalists Announced

The 2013 Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Māori Excellence in Farming Award finalists have been announced. The Ahuwhenua Trophy is the premier award for Māori in agriculture, and marks its 80th anniversary this year.

The finalists in the 2013 sheep and beef competition are:

• Te Uranga B2 Incorporation – Upoko B2
• Te Awahohonu Forest Trust – Tarawera Station
• Te Hape B Trust – Te Hape Station

Chairman of the Ahuwhenua Trophy competition Management Committee, Kingi Smiler says the longevity of the competition reflects the commitment Māori farmers have, as kaitiaki of their lands for future generations.

“It is also a celebration of their continued resilience over the years and their business acumen in performing at a consistently high level” he said.

Kingi Smiler says that the contemporary competition highlights successful collaboration with the wider business, banking and farming communities.

“Increasingly Māori farmers are exploring opportunities beyond the farm gate to develop direct linkages between the products they produce and customers in international markets.”

Background on Finalists

Te Uranga B2 Incorporation’s sheep and beef operation, Upoko B2, is situated 13 kms north east of Taumarunui. Upoko B2 is one of four integrated business units which includes two dairy farms (210ha and 132ha), a forestry right (556ha), and Nga Whenua Rahui Kawenata areas (117ha) and wood lots (50ha). The Incorporation also has a diversified share and investment portfolio which complements its farming enterprises.

Upoko B2 has 1,123 effective hectares on which it carries 12,500 stock units (average 2011/2012), of which 56% are sheep including a ewe breeding flock of mixed aged Romney - Coopworths and 44% cattle which includes an Angus breeding herd.

Te Uranga B2 Incorporation was established in 1910 and has been trading for over 100 years.

Tarawera Station is owned by the Te Awahohonu Forest Trust and is situated 60kms northwest of Napier on the Napier-Taupo Road.

It is a medium to steep hill country property with a small amount of flat land, made up of both ancestral and leased land totalling 3,546 hectares, of which 2,865ha is effective. It runs 30,000 stock units (average 2011/2012) 68% of which are sheep and 32% are cattle. Both sheep and cattle are made up of composite breeds.

Te Hape Station is 3,100 hectare (effective) property situated in rolling country to the west of Mt Pureora in the northern King Country.

It is administered by the Te Hape B Trust, which along with its sister entity, Tiroa E Trust is owned by the wider Rereahu Lands Trust.

Te Hape B averaged 31,000 stock units over 2011/2012, 62% of which are Perenedale cross sheep, and 38% of which are cattle, mainly Angus. Te Hape B has implemented a substantial development and capital expenditure programme over the last decade. It maintains kaitiakitanga over a number of wahi tapu sites within its boundaries.

Field Days

Public field days will be held on the property of each finalist on the following days:

• 23rd April 2013 Te Uranga B2 Incorporation – Upoko B2
244 Ngakonui Ongarue Rd, Taumarunui
• 2nd May 2013 Te Awahohonu Forest Trust – Tarawera Station
4260 State Highway 5 Te Haroto, Hawke’s Bay
• 9th May 2013 Te Hape B Trust – Te Hape Station
1106 State Highway 30, R.D.7 Te Kuiti

Final Event

The supreme award winner and recipient of the Ahuwhenua Trophy will be announced at the Awards Dinner at the Pettigrew Green Arena, Taradale, on Friday 7th June 2013. Tickets for this event are available from the Ahuwhenua Trophy competitions administrator, Marama Steele at ahuwhenuacompetition@maoritrustee.co.nz.

Prizes

As well as being presented with the historic Ahuwhenua Trophy, this year’s winner will receive a replica of the trophy, a prestigious medal based on a 1932 design and up to $40,000 in cash and farm-related products and services. Each finalist will receive a medal and $15,000 in cash and farm-related products and services.

History

This year marks the 80th anniversary of the first Ahuwhenua Trophy competition and 10 years since it was re-launched in 2003. The Ahuwhenua Trophy Award was established in 1932 by Sir Apirana Ngata with the support of the then Governor General, Lord Bledisloe. The first competition was won in 1933 by William Swinton of Raukokore (Bay of Plenty). Each year the Ahuwhenua Trophy competition alternates between sheep and beef farmers and dairy farmers. This year the competition is for Māori sheep and beef farmers.

Criteria

The Ahuwhenua Trophy competition celebrates business excellence in the New Zealand pastoral sector and is open to Māori farming properties either owned individually, or managed by Māori Trusts and Incorporations in New Zealand.

Entrants are tested on a range of protocols based on the efficiency with which the property is farmed relative to its potential. While financial performance, effective governance and management practices are important considerations judges also take into account conditions that affect financial performance such as climatic conditions and market returns.

Sponsors

BNZ is the Platinum Sponsor for the Award. Gold Sponsors are Beef + Lamb New Zealand, Te Puni Kōkiri, Ministry for Primary Industries and the Māori Trustee. Silver Sponsors are PGG Wrightson, AgResearch, AgITO and Ballance Agri-Nutrients, and Bronze Sponsors are, AFFCO, BDO, Allflex and Polaris. Sponsor support is also supplied by Tohu Wines, the Federation of Māori Authorities, Landcorp, Agrecovery Rural Recycling Programme and DB Breweries.


www.ahuwhenuatrophy.maori.nz

ENDS

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