Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Imogen Taylor: Glory Hole


Imogen Taylor, Hidden Agenda, 2014, acrylic on hessian, 160 x 130 cm

Imogen Taylor
Glory Hole

15 October - 22 November
Preview Wednesday 15 October 6-8pm


Michael Lett is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Imogen Taylor, her third solo exhibition with the gallery. Continuing her interest in balancing between abstraction and representation, these works carry the artist’s signature forms and colour palette although on a much larger scale than seen before. Taylor’s ongoing appreciation for a camp sensibility is apparent in this show as macho gesture of proportions; in Glory Hole size does matter.

Imogen Taylor’s works hold an ongoing conversation with histories of painting, both internationally and locally. References to historical movements of the 20th century, such as Futurism, Dada and Cubism, filter through her work. As large, nebulous movements, they are given more particular acknowledgment through references to the work of New Zealand painters and the histories of painting in this country. Nods to Tony Fomison, Philip Clairmont and Rita Angus create a dialogue about the lineage of painting in New Zealand that may often be considered unfashionable or irrelevant in contemporary art discourse.

Taylor’s revelry in what is off trend and what is mannered and ostentatious is also manifest in her material choices. Combining bright and ‘artificial’ colour with hessian canvases, she creates a juxtaposition of the organic and alien. This tension produces a sense of vulnerability that is humorous and awkward. Emphasising this are the human forms and suggestions of bodily functions - penetration, secretion and taction – that push through her layers of abstraction. The sensuality and potential sexuality in Taylor’s work is light yet enthralling. “Camp,” says Susan Sontag, “is a solvent of morality. It neutralizes moral indignation, sponsors playfulness.” In Glory Hole Imogen Taylor presents a world where erotics are arousing, not for their anonymity or discretion, but rather their resolute presence.

Imogen Taylor (b. 1985, Whangarei) graduated from Elam School of Fine Arts in 2010 and lives and works in Auckland. Recent exhibitions include Girls Abstraction, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington (group) 2014; From the Vault, Gus Fisher Gallery, Auckland (group) 2014; New Paintings, Michael Lett, Auckland (solo) 2013; and Blow Hole, Kalimanrawlins, Melbourne (solo) 2013.

_____________
[1] Sontag, Susan. Notes on ‘Camp', Against Interpretation and Other Essays. London: Penguin, 1966.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: Charlotte Yates' Mansfield Project

Katherine Mansfield's vapid verses are of even less interest than her over-rated short stories, but Yates has risen to the challenge of producing a fascinating compilation album by a variety of musicians to accompany her poetry. More>>

Howard Davis: Dazed & Confused by Beats

Beats is both a coming-of-age tale and a romantic movie about endings, set to a nostalgic backdrop of the disappearing tail of the UK's illegal rave scene. More>>

Howard Davis: And The Oscar Goes To … Parasite
For its deliciously dark wit and genre-bending ingenuity, Bong Joon-ho's latest movie has just won four out of a potential six Academy Awards, including Best Screenplay and Director. Only ten foreign-language films have previously been nominated for Best Picture and none have won before. More>>

Howard Davis: 1917's 1,000 Yard Stare

Sam Mendes has created a terrible and barbarous trek, one that we appreciate all the more for being catapulted right into the midst of this ear-splitting melee from the film's opening sequence. More>>

Howard Davis: 1917's 1,000 Yard Stare

Sam Mendes has created a terrible and barbarous trek, one that we appreciate all the more for being catapulted right into the midst of this ear-splitting melee from the film's opening sequence. More>>

Over 150 Productions: NZ Fringe 2020 Has Launched

The upcoming festival will be held at 40 venues all over Wellington Region from 28 February to 21 March, and includes every genre possible—theatre, comedy, dance, music, clowning, cabaret, visual art, children’s shows and more! More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland