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New Name, Logo, & Website for NZ Screen Industry Guild

New Name, New Look & New Guide Book For New Zealand's Screen Industry Guild

24 October, 2017 (Auckland) – On the occasion of its 30th anniversary, the New Zealand Film and Video Technicians Guild has revealed a new name, a fresh logo and website as well as revised labour guidelines for the engagement of screen industry crew while working in New Zealand.

The Guild, which represents many different sectors of the New Zealand screen industry, announced tonight in Auckland that it has formally changed its name to the Screen Industry Guild with the full name of the organisation being the Screen Industry Guild of Aotearoa New Zealand Incorporated.

One of the key focuses of the Guild for many years has been the development and publication of the industry-accepted code of practice when engaging screen production crew in New Zealand. The previous edition printed in 2004 and known colloquially as ‘The Blue Book’, formalises labour conditions for those working on film, television, video and digital productions in New Zealand. The 2017 revision, revealed tonight, brings The Blue Book up-to-date with current New Zealand labour laws as well as the newer health and safety legislation. It was negotiated by the Screen Industry Guild with both the Screen Production and Development Association of New Zealand (SPADA) and the New Zealand Advertising Producers Group (NZAPG).

Ensuring Kiwi film sets are a safe place for all personnel to work has been a long-time focus of the Guild which continues to play pivotal role as an advocate for workplace health and safety in the local screen sector. The Screen Industry Guild (then called ‘The Techo’s Guild’) was the driving force behind the establishment of Screensafe, an industry-wide collaboration between screen industry funders, guilds and regional film offices whose aim is to support and promote health and safety in the New Zealand screen sector.

Also at tonight’s event the Guild’s new branding was revealed including a new-look logo and an updated members’ website: www.screenguild.co.nz.

"The Techos' Guild has been at the forefront of the development of the New Zealand film industry over the last three decades," says Guild President Richard Bluck. "As we move forward the Guild has chosen to rebrand itself to meet the challenges of the next three decades and beyond. With the move to digital formats and new screen distribution methods we embrace a wider group of screen members to ensure the industry remains a collaborative industry. We are committed to ensuring all our screen industry members have safe and healthy workplaces. It is an exciting time and we are honoured to be part of it and to provide a voice for our members."


Vice President Sioux Macdonald says: "Having been on the Executive Committee for 20 years, and Vice President for almost 10 years, I am most proud of what the organization has managed to achieve particularly in the last four years in regard to supporting the industry during some tough times, and how far we have come with the rebirth of the new Blue Book, and more up to date ScreenSafe documents. I would like to think that the Guild is known for its ability to provide excellent support to both national and international producers and production teams working in our wonderful country."

Further regional celebrations will be held this week with Guild executives, members, VIP guests and industry representatives in Wellington on Wednesday 25th October and in Queenstown on Thursday 26th October.

ENDS


About the Screen Industry Guild of Aotearoa New Zealand Inc.

Established in 1987 and formally incorporated in 1988, the Screen Industry Guild is a non-profit professional organization which represents the interests of screen technicians and allied creative skills in the New Zealand screen production industry. Currently the Screen Industry Guild has close to 400 active members.


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