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RLWC2017 To Be Broadcast In 128 Countries

RLWC2017 To Be Broadcast In 128 Countries

The Rugby League World Cup 2017 will be broadcast in 128 countries around the globe to a potential audience of 160 million viewers.

The 15th version of the tournament, which was first hosted by France in 1954 and is the second oldest World Cup, kicks off in Melbourne on Friday night with defending champions Australia and traditional foes England continuing a 109-year rivalry.

The match will be broadcast in Australia on the Seven network, while fans in the United Kingdom and Ireland will be able to watch the clash on BBC Sport and Premier Sports.

In New Zealand, which is co-hosting RLWC2017, matches will be televised by Sky Sport, while EM TV will broadcast the tournament in Papua New Guinea, where the Kumuls will play their three pool games against Wales, Ireland and USA.

Fiji TV will broadcast games in the Pacific, including Fiji, Samoa and Tonga, who have all named strong squads for the tournament, as well as Cook Islands, Nauru, Niue, America Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tuvala and Vanuatu.

In the United States, Fox Sports will broadcast matches to an audience of up to 85 million viewers, while BeIN Sports will show all matches in France.

RLWC2017 will also be broadcast in 26 countries in the Middle East, including Lebanon, on OSN Sport, while viewers in another 55 countries in Africa can tune in on Germany and Austria on Econet.

Other countries where fans can watch RLWC2017 include Japan (DAZN), Malaysia (Astro), Hong Kong (PCCW), Germany and Austria (ProSiebenSat1).

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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