Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Simon Denny - 'The Founder's Paradox'

Simon Denny The Founder's Paradox

18 November – 22 December, Opening Saturday 18 November 12–2pm

On Thursday 16 November, we are pleased to present a public conversation with Simon Denny. Simon will be joined by Mark O’Connell, the Irish journalist and author of To Be a Machine, and Anthony Byrt, author of This Model World, in conversation with Paperboy editor Jeremy Hansen. This talk will take place at the Auckland headquarters of Warren and Mahoney, 139 Pakenham St. West, at 6pm. Seats are limited.

Michael Lett is pleased to present a new body of work by Simon Denny, his fifth exhibition with the gallery. Featuring new sculptures and wall-based works developed in close conversation with author and journalist Anthony Byrt, The Founder’s Paradox uses the framework of gaming to reflect on competing political visions for New Zealand’s future within a global climate of uncertainty and changing social relations. In an increasingly fractured and fractious world, the “neoliberal status quo” in New Zealand is starting to be questioned at both ends of the political spectrum.

On one side is the tech-libertarian vision embodied in the ideas of super-investor Peter Thiel, who became a New Zealand citizen in 2011. Thiel’s beliefs in individual freedom and monopoly capitalism have been central to his rise in Silicon Valley and to his support of Donald Trump. His business-minded worldview is heavily influenced by Christian philosophy, The Lord of the Rings, and a libertarian text from 1997 called The Sovereign Individual: How To Survive and Thrive During the Collapse of the Welfare State. Thiel has also recently bought 193 hectares of land in Wanaka, and invested in some of New Zealand’s leading tech companies.

The other side is expressed in The New Zealand Project, by Oxford-based writer Max Harris. Harris’s book argues that neoliberalism has failed New Zealand, turning it into a society in which individual interests are rewarded and politicians have become economic managers rather than social visionaries. Harris proposes that our future depends on embracing care, creativity, and community, so that we create a fairer country through the processes of redistribution, collectivism and decolonisation.

The Founder’s Paradox explores these competing utopian visions, using the language and logic of board games. The Thiel/Sovereign Individual worldview is examined in “world-building” fantasy games in which heroes must accumulate resources, complete quests and eliminate their enemies. Harris’s ideas are put into play via games that involve physical dexterity and a certain amount of cooperation – Twister, and Giant Jenga. A version of The Game of Life, in which players face several forks in the road, bridges the two: giving players the chance to choose between the path of collective action, or press on towards individual sovereignty.

The Founder’s Paradox is accompanied by a new publication, designed by David Bennewith and containing a major new essay by Anthony Byrt.


ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 


Howard Davis: Emerald Fennell's Promising Young Woman'


The Guardian needed not one, but three reviews to do justice to Fennell's unsettling approach, which indicates exactly how ambiguous and controversial its message really is. More>>


Howard Davis: Jill Trevelyan's Rita Angus

Although Angus has become one of Aotearoa’s best-loved painters, the story of her life remained little known and poorly understood before Jill Trevelyan's acclaimed and revelatory biography, which won the Non Fiction Award at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2009, and has now been republished by Te Papa press. More>>

Howard Davis: The Back of the Painting

Painting conservators are the forensic pathologists of the art world. While they cannot bring their subjects back to life, they do provide fascinating insights into the precise circumstances of a painting's creation, its material authenticity, and constructive methodology. More>>


Howard Davis: Black Panthers on the Prowl

A passionate and gripping political drama from Shaka King, this is an informative and instructive tale of human frailty that centers around the charismatic Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton, who was murdered at the age of twenty-one during a police raid. More>>

Howard Davis: Controlling the High Ground

Stephen Johnson's raw and angry film not only poses important questions with scrupulous authenticity, but also provides a timely reminder of the genocidal consequences of casual bigotry and xenophobia. More>>

Howard Davis: Dryzabone - Robert Conolly's The Dry

After the terrible devastation caused by last year’s bushfires, which prompted hundreds of Australians to shelter in the ocean to escape incineration and destroyed uncountable amounts of wildlife, The Dry has been released during a totally different kind of dry spell. More>>


Howard Davis: Hit the Road, Jack - Chloé Zhao's Nomadland

Nomadland is perhaps the ultimately 'road' movie as it follows a group of dispossessed and disenfranchised vagabonds who find a form of communal refuge in camp sites and trailer parks after the economic contraction of 2008. More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland