Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Amelia Berry wins the Ryman-backed Mina Foley Scholarship

MEDIA RELEASE February 26, 2018

Ryman backs Dame Malvina Major Foundation to bring Kiwi opera singers to New Zealand

Amelia Berry wins the Ryman-backed Mina Foley Scholarship


Amelia Berry and James Benjamin Rodgers in NZ Opera’s Sweeney Todd in 2016. Photo: David Rowland


Long-term supporter of the Dame Malvina Major Foundation, Ryman Healthcare, is helping bring young New Zealand singers back home to perform.

In partnership with the Foundation, Ryman Healthcare will sponsor the Ryman DMMF Mina Foley Scholarship to enable talented young singers to return to New Zealand to perform in a professional season with New Zealand Opera.

The scholarship was started in 2008 in memory of one of New Zealand’s most promising vocal talents of yesteryear. The soprano, Mina Foley, captivated New Zealand audiences with the quality and technique of her singing in the 1950s. Her career was an inspiration for singers like Dame Malvina Major and Dame Kiri Te Kanawa.

This year’s Ryman DMMF Mina Foley Scholar, soprano, Amelia Berry, is returning home from New York for the roles of Cunégonde in Candide and Musetta in La bohème. Born in Wellington, Amelia is a graduate of the New Zealand School of Music and has a Master’s degree from the Manhattan School of Music.

She is a 2010/2011 PwC Dame Malvina Major Emerging Artist and 2015 Dame Malvina Major Young Artist with New Zealand Opera and her wins include the New Zealand Aria in 2010 as well as the Napier, Wellington and Otago Arias.

Dame Malvina said the Foundation was thrilled to cement its long-standing relationship with Ryman Healthcare and “Share the Dream” through this worthy scholarship.

“The Dame Malvina Major Foundation has enjoyed a rewarding partnership with Ryman over many years. Through concerts at Ryman villages featuring our young artists, and broader support for our work, we share a mutual love of the arts and the enriching contribution it makes to all our lives.

“Ryman is clearly committed to supporting the future of performing arts in New Zealand and in ensuring its residents get to enjoy the talent being nurtured across the country today.

Ryman Healthcare Chief Executive Gordon MacLeod said it was a pleasure to be able to support the Mina Foley Scholarship and to help bring Amelia back home to perform.

“Ryman has been supporting the Dame Malvina Major Foundation for more than 15 years and over that time Dame Malvina and her students have entertained thousands of our residents. We can’t think of a better way to support our talented artists.’’

About Ryman: Ryman Healthcare was founded in Christchurch in 1984 and owns and operates 32 retirement villages in New Zealand and Australia. Ryman villages are home to over 10,500 residents, and the company employs over 4,500 staff.

Contacts: For media information or images contact David King, Corporate Affairs Manager, on 021 499 602 (+64 21 499 602) or email david.king@rymanhealthcare.com.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: Charlotte Yates' Mansfield Project

Katherine Mansfield's vapid verses are of even less interest than her over-rated short stories, but Yates has risen to the challenge of producing a fascinating compilation album by a variety of musicians to accompany her poetry. More>>

Howard Davis: Dazed & Confused by Beats

Beats is both a coming-of-age tale and a romantic movie about endings, set to a nostalgic backdrop of the disappearing tail of the UK's illegal rave scene. More>>

Howard Davis: And The Oscar Goes To … Parasite

For its deliciously dark wit and genre-bending ingenuity, Bong Joon-ho's latest movie has just won four out of a potential six Academy Awards, including Best Screenplay and Director. Only ten foreign-language films have previously been nominated for Best Picture and none have won before. More>>


Howard Davis: 1917's 1,000 Yard Stare

Sam Mendes has created a terrible and barbarous trek, one that we appreciate all the more for being catapulted right into the midst of this ear-splitting melee from the film's opening sequence. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland