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Last chance to visit The obliteration room

Last chance to visit Yayoi Kusama’s The obliteration room

This Easter weekend offers the last chance to visit Yayoi Kusama’s exceptionally popular participatory installation, The obliteration room, at Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki.

Since opening in December, more than 130,000 visitors have obliterated the once pure-white room with over 2.6 million stickers, transforming the space into a spectacular display of colour and creativity.

This week, the Gallery released a time-lapse video of the room’s transformation, check that out here.

The obliteration room, originally developed by Yayoi Kusama for the Queensland Art Gallery’s APT 2002: Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, has toured to London, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janiero, Brasilia, São Paulo, Mexico City, Shanghai, South Korea, Switzerland and France, as well as Dunedin.

Kusama was recently named the world’s most popular artist, based on figures for global museum attendance and, in 2016, was selected as one of TIME magazine’s World’s 100 Most Influential People.

Entry to The obliteration room is free for New Zealand residents and runs until 5pm on Easter Monday 2 April.


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