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Strategy charts bold vision for the future of Pacific Arts

Creative New Zealand Strategy charts bold vision for the future of Pacific Arts

25 September, 2018

A national Pacific Arts Strategy launched today will mean better support for the Pacific Arts community, in recognition of its unique contribution to the cultural landscape of New Zealand.

Creative New Zealand’s Pacific Arts Strategy 2018-2023 will help the national arts development agency direct and prioritise increased investment to support the development of Pacific Arts.

“Our vision for the future is of a powerful Pacific Arts sector led by passionate and skilled Pasifika people, for Aotearoa, Te Moana-nui-a-Kiva, and the world. We are looking forward to delivering this strategy over the next few years, in collaboration with the Pasifika Arts community, in partnership with other stakeholders, for all of New Zealand,” says Arts Council member, Caren Rangi.

The strategy will apply to all of Creative New Zealand’s programmes and policies, including arts funding, investments, grants, international capability and advocacy programmes from 2018-2023.

“This strategy has been developed in consultation with the Pacific Arts community, which is growing, dynamic and ambitious. As such it is agile so it can meet their needs in a fast changing national and global environment,” says Caren Rangi.

The strategy has two parts, a strategic direction and priorities for action over the next five years.

The strategic direction includes aspirational goals and areas of focus (pou) based on concepts that embrace the essence of Pasifika peoples and cultures. These are:

Tagata

Pasifika artists and arts practitioners are resourced to develop their practice and deliver outstanding work

Vaka

Pacific Arts groups, collectives and organisations are supported to help lead and grow Pacific Arts in Aotearoa

Va

An innovative and networked Pacific Arts environment exists, so that Pacific Arts are strengthened for future success

Moana

Meaningful connections, across Aotearoa, Oceania and globally, ensure that Pacific Arts are further enriched.

“Pacific Arts help to define our cultural identity and connect the people of Aotearoa to our Pacific island neighbours – we hope this strategy will serve as a foundation to strengthen these bonds.

“We thank all those who contributed to the development of this strategy, and in particular those in the Pacific Arts community. We are excited to begin this journey with Pasifika artists and communities,” says Caren Rangi.


Read the Pacific Arts Strategy 2018-2023.

Ngā mihi

ends

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