Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

When Toawaka met Cook

In a new book released today, the claim is made that not all Māori saw the arrival of Captain James Cook in Aotearoa New Zealand as ‘an invasion by a murderous pirate’.

Such charges have been voiced loudly in recent months leading up to the Government’s Tuia 250 commemoration of Cook’s landings in October this year.

In their book When Toawaka Met Cook, authors and Mercury Bay historians John Steele and Richard Gates quote Ngāti Hei’s Joe Davis as saying that his people, led by their chief Toawaka (or Toiava in most earlier published historical texts) saw the Endeavour’s arrival in Te Whanganui o Hei – Mercury Bay as an omen of change, after years of brutal warfare and invasion by other Māori tribes.

According to Ngāti Hei’s oral history, Toawaka believed that these ‘pale-faced strangers with all their new powers’ might be the answer to helping him and his people develop a better way of life, and halting the fear and bloodshed of their previous 300 years.

For Ngāti Hei therefore, Joe Davis says Cook’s visit over 12 days in November 1769, was seen as an amicable encounter – acknowledged in their Wharetāewa pa a few days before the Endeavour sailed by the very first pōwhiri accorded a European. “The visit was always seen by Toawaka and our ancestors,” says Davis, “as a ‘decisive first step toward new beginnings’, both for Ngāti Hei and many of our other Hauraki tribal allies of those days’.

When Toawaka Met Cook, described as an ‘insightful and engaging read’ is being released throughout New Zealand on June 22 and will cost $24.99.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: Charlotte Yates' Mansfield Project

Katherine Mansfield's vapid verses are of even less interest than her over-rated short stories, but Yates has risen to the challenge of producing a fascinating compilation album by a variety of musicians to accompany her poetry. More>>

Howard Davis: Dazed & Confused by Beats

Beats is both a coming-of-age tale and a romantic movie about endings, set to a nostalgic backdrop of the disappearing tail of the UK's illegal rave scene. More>>

Howard Davis: And The Oscar Goes To … Parasite

For its deliciously dark wit and genre-bending ingenuity, Bong Joon-ho's latest movie has just won four out of a potential six Academy Awards, including Best Screenplay and Director. Only ten foreign-language films have previously been nominated for Best Picture and none have won before. More>>


Howard Davis: 1917's 1,000 Yard Stare

Sam Mendes has created a terrible and barbarous trek, one that we appreciate all the more for being catapulted right into the midst of this ear-splitting melee from the film's opening sequence. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland