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NZTrio's 2019 Grand Finale Performances Spark Uprising


After a stunning first year together, NZTrio will be closing out their 2019 programme with Tectonic Uprising, the final part of their Tectonic series, on at Auckland’s Mairangi Arts Centre on 11 December and Auckland Art Gallery 15 December.

2019 has seen three of New Zealand’s most gifted musicians Ashley Brown, Somi Kim, and Amalia Hall join forces as the newly invigorated NZTrio for what has been an intense and exhilarating first year of concerts together.

"They play as if they’ve been together for years and their communication was impeccable, especially in some of those tricky rhythmic passages that required adroit counting and keen anticipation… they really delivered on the passion, drawing out every nuance and drop of feeling. This was an excellent concert and one that augurs well for the new NZTrio." - Patrick Shepherd, Christchurch Press

NZTrio’s 2019 Tectonic series features an intense and intimate inspection of the fundamental forces that shape environments and communities, focusing here on Aotearoa’s fraught relationship with the United Kingdom, and the struggle between Cold War superpowers Russia and America. In this final episode, Tectonic Uprising features parlour music from Bridge, and a rediscovered trio by Elgar – mannered distractions from the building of empires and the noise of war and industrialisation in the England of their time. Charlotte Bray illuminates contemporary England while also looking back to the enduring words of Shakespeare – and New Zealand composer, Samuel Holloway, turns the gaze inwards to the human landscape and the mechanisms of hearing. In the second half, the prescience and experimentation of US composer, Charles Ives meets the subversive rebellion of Shostakovich – two profoundly contrasting sides of an iron curtain that takes on new meaning and significance today.

"The light-filled North atrium is a haven for experiencing afternoon drifting into evening with Alfredo and Isabel Aquilizan’s suspended ceiling sculptures of cardboard cities tumbling from upturned dinghies perfectly echoing the torrents of musical notes below." - William Dart, NZ Herald

Both performances are followed by an opportunity to meet and chat with the musicians over complimentary drinks and Xmas nibbles.

Interviews are available with the newly formed trio, which was announced earlier this year. Click here for more info on the incredible talents of: Ashley Brown (cello), Amalia Hall (violin) and Somi Kim (piano).

Programme:

Frank Bridge (UK) Hornpipe
Edward Elgar (UK) Lento assai - Allegro moderato
Samuel Holloway (NZ) Stapes
Frank Bridge (UK) Valse Russe
Charlotte Bray (UK) That Crazed Smile
Charles Ives (US) Trio
Dmitri Shostakovich (USSR) Piano Trio No.2 in e minor

Approx. 90 mins plus interval.
Complimentary drinks and nibbles with musicians following the performance.

DATES AND BOOKING DETAILS:
NZTrio: Tectonic Uprising

December 11th, 7pm
Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland North Shore
Tickets $40 Adults/$30 MAC Members/$20 Students
Bookings via Eventfinda

December 15th, 6pm
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki
Tickets $50 Adults/$40 AAG Members/$25 Students
Bookings via Eventfinda

Website: www.nztrio.com/event-directory/
Facebook: facebook.com/nztrio
Twitter: twitter.com/nztrio (@nztrio)
Instagram: NZTrio

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