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Gisborne Punk-rockers SIT DOWN IN FRONT Announce New EP 'Fuelling My Rage' For Release: 21st January 2022

Today, Gisborne punk-rockers Sit Down In Front announce the release of a brand new EP Fuelling My Rage, set for release in January 2022 on Best & Fairest. Pre-order the EP here.

Tickets are on sale now for their hometown EP release show on January 21st at Gisborne's "home of good times" and the band's local haunt, Smash Palace. Tickets are available from Gisborne Boardriders, Parafed Gisborne and Midway Surf Lifesaving Club and online at https://www.eventspronto.co.nz/sitdowninfront.

In October, the band released their smash hit 'Pixie Caramel' featuring the legendary Tiki Taane. 'Pixie Caramel' is another day in the lives of these teenage punks, a fast and raw track about going to the corner dairy only to find out their favourite snack had sold out! The rebellious rockers know how to deliver a fast and upbeat punk rock anthem with genuine charm and a good sense of humour. This single followed the scorching slice of punk rock political commentary, 'Don't Drink Bleach', released in July 2021.

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Both singles feature on the new EP, produced by Greg Havers (Manic Street Preachers) alongside three brand new stonking punk rock anthems! Everyone to the front! Pre-order the EP here.

Sit Down in Front's brand of rock is built on the foundations of classic punk. They successfully capture the essence and energy of the old while adding some scorching and youthful enthusiasm.

The three-piece is led from the front by frontman and lyricist Cory Newman, who uses a wheelchair due to his Cerebral Palsy. His energetic live performances have seen him likened to "a young Johnny Rotten". Talented guitarist Jackson Clarke and multi-talented self-taught drummer Rikki Noble complete the line-up.

Since forming in high school in January 2017, the Gisborne Punk-Rock band, have been impressing fans in Aotearoa and abroad. They self-produced their 2018 debut album Red Light Runner in the small-town of Wairoa, New Zealand, and after winning the 2019 East Coast Smokefree Rockquest regional final, they were placed third nationally. In 2020 they released their second album, Confessions Of A Pie Thief.

"For their ripsnorter sophomore release, the four-piece took over Roundhead Studios with a hand from hotshot producer Greg Haver resulting in some mind-melting riffage and bass harmony, playing off of every punchy lyric belted out by sixteen year old lead singer Cory Newman" -undertheradar.co.nz

"A bludgeoning blend of uncompromising rock and punk spirit" - Around The Sound

Over the years, the band has toured Aotearoa with Aussie shed-rockers The Chats, Australian rock 'n' roll icon Jimmy Barnes, and local heroes John Toogood, The D4 and Head Like A Hole.

In January 2022, the band will release their eagerly anticipated third major body of work titled, Fuelling My Rage, produced by Greg Havers (Manic Street Preachers).

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