Scoop has an Ethical Paywall
Work smarter with a Pro licence Learn More

Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Two Weeks Left To Get RUIA And Tama Ora Applications In

Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu has put the call out to rangatahi Māori to bring their ideas around wellbeing and intergenerational leadership to the table.

The Whānau Ora Commissioning Agency for the South Island currently has two contestable funds open for applications, Ruia and Tama Ora, and with two weeks left before closing, communities across Te Waipounamu, Rakiura and Rēkohu/Wharekauri are encouraged to share the word and help boost awareness.

Pouārahi Ivy Harper said both RUIA and Tama Ora were unique in that they were a partnership with other organisations and supported tamariki and rangatahi Māori to achieve their own aspirations and solutions fit for what they were seeing in their own communities.

It was vital that when it came to their own wellbeing, rangatahi had a say in decision-making and RUIA, in particular, enabled that to happen, Harper said.

“RUIA is a partnership with Rātā Foundation and the Ministry of Youth Development that was founded in 2019, pre-pandemic, to enable rangatahi, their whānau and their tuakana to identify and create ways to support not only wellbeing, but also intergenerational leadership. Succession planning and cultural development are other crucial elements. The principle behind RUIA when it was created remains the same today: rangatahi have to be part of the decision-making process when it comes to their own growth and development.”

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

Hundreds of rangatahi have taken part in RUIA initiatives in recent years, from the top of the south to Stewart Island. Activities have included wānanga, exhibitions, noho marae, field trips, gym and boxing sessions and a kapa haka festival. RUIA is rangatahi led, with a decision panel of five rangatahi having the say on which initiatives are supported.

While RUIA is open to initiatives aimed at rangatahi aged 12 to 24 years, Tama Ora also takes in activities for younger children and is aimed at tamariki and rangatahi aged 5 to 25 years.

A partnership between Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu and Sport New Zealand Ihi Aotearoa, Tama Ora is aligned with Sport New Zealand’s He Oranga Poutama, designed to create pathways for tamariki and rangatahi Māori to stay active.

Tama Ora is open to individuals and groups in Te Waipounamu, Rakiura and Rēkohu/Wharekauri who want to create an event, project or programme that will help tamariki and rangatahi build healthy habits, learn new skills, and work towards goals and achievements within their chosen activity.

Harper said past Tama Ora initiatives had provided opportunities for tamariki and rangatahi Māori that otherwise would not have been available and urged those looking to apply to get ahead of the deadline.

Applications for RUIA and Tama Ora close at noon on Friday, June 16, 2023.

For further information and to apply, see the Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu website.

NOTES

1. Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu is the Whānau Ora Commissioning Agency for the South Island.

2. To apply for Tama Ora funding, visit https://www.teputahitanga.org/what-we-do/funding/tama-ora/

3. To apply for Ruia funding, visit https://www.teputahitanga.org/what-we-do/funding/ruia/

4. Whānau Ora was introduced in 2010 and comprises a group of whānau-centred initiatives, which includes the Whānau Ora commissioning approach, under which Te Puni Kōkiri contracts three commissioning agencies to invest in whānau-centred kaupapa throughout the country.

5. ‘Tama Ora’ comes from the whakataukī ‘Tama tū tama ora, tama noho tama mate which translates to ‘An active person will live while a lazy person will not’. These are words of encouragement to urge rangatahi to participate in physical activities and exercise so that they can make good choices for their own health which will also benefit their whānau.

6. “E kore au e ngaro, he kākano i ruia mai i Rangiātea. I will never be lost, for I am a seed sown in Rangiātea.” The whakataukī for Ruia reflects our collective goal of supporting rangatahi wellbeing, intergenerational leadership, succession planning, cultural development and access to initiatives that support rangatahi growth and development.

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.