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Cash-strapped University Flouts Government Policy


Cash-strapped University Flouts Government Policy Direction

The decision by Massey University to establish a nursing degree at its Palmerston North campus, in direct competition with the local polytechnic’s nursing degree, is short-sighted and flies in the face of Government policy.

The Aotearoa Post-compulsory Student Union (APSU) has learnt that Massey University has applied to the Committee on University Academic Programmes (CUAP) for approval for a four-year Bachelor of Nursing programme.

“The degree will be run in direct competition with the Universal College of Learning (UCOL) nursing programme and has the potential to seriously hurt the financial viability of UCOL,” said David Penney APSU National President.

“What’s more, the Massey decision to go head-to-head with UCOL’s flagship programme is in direct defiance of the Government’s desire to see more regional co-operation and collaboration between tertiary providers.”

“I think it is very foolish for Massey University to pretend that the Government hasn’t changed and simply continue to operate in such a competitive way. Students can be the only losers.”

“We understand that a bidding war for student placements in hospitals is hotting up. It will be student money that will thrown around in any bidding war.”

“It is particularly ironic that Massey University, which is claiming poverty as the reason behind the massive staff redundancies, still has the money to invest in setting up an expensive programme like Nursing,” concluded David Penney.

ENDS For more comment contact:

David Penney

National President

025 756 526 (cell) 04 498 2501 (work) David Penney National President Aotearoa Tertiary Students' Association (formerly APSU) PO Box 10 191 Wellington New Zealand Phone 04 498 2507 Mobile 025 756 526 Fax 04 499 6554


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