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Boost to Book Industry Assistance in Australia

Australian creators and publishers, whose books are held in educational lending libraries, are now eligible to receive payments through the Educational Lending Right (ELR) program.

ELR complements the existing Public Lending Right (PLR) scheme, which covers public lending libraries.

"Australia is the only country in the world to have introduced this unique scheme," Federal Minister for the Arts, Peter McGauran, said.

"This is great news for eligible authors, compilers, editors, illustrators, translators and publishers of books," he said.

As part of its Book Industry Assistance Plan, the Federal Government will provide $38 million over 4 years for ELR.

"ELR is another demonstration of the Government's support for the enrichment of Australian culture by encouraging the growth and development of Australian writing and publishing", Mr McGauran said.

It recognises the literary gift to the nation by Australian creators and publishers and acknowledges that income is lost from the free multiple use of their books in educational libraries.

The 2000-01 program will cover books published between 1980 and 1999 that have been offered for sale and have an International Standard Book Number (ISBN).

Creators and publishers who are registered for PLR and have ELR-eligible books will receive a letter, guidelines and registration & claim form inviting them to apply for ELR.

For more detail see www.dcita.gov.au

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