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Massey collective agreement ratified

AUS WEB SITE
Massey University staff unions ratified a one-year collective employment agreement last Friday 27th October. Although staff gained a 1.7% wage increase, this becomes effective upon ratification rather than being backdated to the expiry of the previous contract in July.

Staff were pleased that management finally agreed to their suggestion to further assist those people leaving Massey as a result of the redundancies this year. The University is accordingly establishing an Employment Assistance Fund of $250,000 administered jointly by the Unions and management, to which those leaving can apply for grants of up to $10,000.

"We also got management to withdraw proposed clawbacks in retirement clauses, which we thought was a significant gain given this year's push to be rid of staff. Management also agreed to a workloads clause that requires workload allocations which are 'transparent, equitable, flexible and that promote the wellbeing and safety of staff'," said newly elected AUS Massey President Dr Karen Rhodes.

"Despite these gains, 16% of AUS members voted to continue industrial action. This is the highest level of dissent against a settlement with management that we have ever encountered. I think this has to be taken as a message to management that they will encounter stiff demands when this agreement expires a year from now. Staff are still angry about the management style at Massey University, and staff will work toward the collegial model of university governance," said Dr Rhodes.

For more comment please contact Karen Rhodes at (w) 3569099 extn 7296 or
(h) (06) 3561100

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