Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Knowledge Society Requires Wave Of Reinvestment

Knowledge Society Requires Wave Of Reinvestment In Tertiary Education

“If New Zealand is going to have a knowledge society there needs to be major reinvestment to improve quality and access to tertiary education,” said Andrew Campbell, Co-President of the New Zealand University Student’s Association (NZUSA).

Campbell, who is one of the few student leaders attending the Catching the Knowledge Wave Conference says the investment will have to be more that what the government is offering in its current fee freeze deal.

“We support the government’s attempts to freeze fees. But we all need to realise that if tertiary education is to meet the needs of a new knowledge society, that there needs to be open access and increased quality,” said Campbell.

“Many of the economies that New Zealand wants to emulate have free education – including Ireland and half of the EU,” said Andrew Campbell. “There’s never been a better time for the government to put together a plan for free education and for greater research and learning in public tertiary education.”

“The Prime Minister has said that this conference has to find solutions outside government and that’s true. But the government also needs to play their part and fund tertiary education to be the engine room of the knowledge society.”

“The government has freed up funds through its PTE moratorium,” said Andrew Campbell. “The time is right for reinvestment in tertiary education.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: Roddy Doyle's Grim and Gritty Rosie

Although it was completed over two years ago, Roddy Doyle's first original screenplay in over eighteen years has only just arrived in New Zealand. It's been well worth the wait. More>>

Simon Nathan: No Ordinary In-Laws

The title of this short memoir by Keith Ovenden is misleading – it would be better called “Bill, Shirley and me” as it is an account of Ovenden’s memories of his parents-in-law, Bill Sutch and Shirley Smith. His presence is pervasive through the book. All three participants are (or were) eloquent, strongly-opinionated intellectuals who have made significant contributions to different aspects of New Zealand life. Their interactions were often complex and difficult... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland