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Budget 2002: More Hype Than Help For Students

23 May 2002

Tertiary students have welcomed news of a 4.5% funding increase for tertiary education, but emphasise that the budget provides no relief for students overburdened with debt.

The 4.5% tertiary funding increase announced in the budget is contingent on tertiary institutions maintaining fees at their current levels. Otago University Students Association President Roz Connelly does not deny the importance of fee stabilisation, but stresses that students wanted more from the Government.

‘We were hopeful the government would address the issue of loans and allowances’ Ms Connelly said. ‘There are so many areas of student support that need attention. For instance the parental income threshold at which a student can receive a student allowance has not been adjusted since 1991 when the scheme was introduced. Rather than fixing this we find that the budget has made no mention of student support at all.’

‘The Government claimed tertiary education was going to be the big winner out of today’s budget, but the truth is there is very little in the budget for students’ said Connelly.


ENDS

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