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Sec Students Told “Bring Extra Pen and Paper”


Sec Students Told “Bring Extra Pen and Paper”

“Parents would be advised to throw an extra pen and pad into their children’s backpack for Term 4 as a ban on practicals takes effect tomorrow, ” Martin Cooney, spokesperson for the September 20 group said today. “The fact that the Degree Equivalent teacher pay issue is still not resolved after mediation last week means industrial disruption this term.”

“Many teachers will gradually begin reducing the number of practical classes from tomorrow 7 October,” said Mr Cooney. “Industrial action is legal in this situation since the pay rates of these teachers has not been decided.”

“Practical classes are mainly taught by the type of teacher who is in Group 1, 2 or 3 equivalent since they are in the skill based areas where degrees were normally not available when they trained and sometimes are still not. This involved home economics, text information processing, technology (wood, metal, plastic), physical education, music, drama, art and so on ”

“The ban will increase in intensity each week during October. This week teachers have been asked to show a video to one class instead of teaching a practical lesson,” said Mr Cooney. “Many students will be copying down notes instead of doing practicals. Parents sick of the longlasting disruption can email Mr Mallard at mailto: mailto:tmallard@ministers.govt.nz and let him know that long held rights cannot be trashed like this without consequences.”

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