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Industries' Skill Needs Gain Prominence

Industries' Skill Needs Gain Prominence

19 October 2005

The Industry Training Federation welcomes the appointment of Hon Dr Michael Cullen as Minister for Tertiary Education and Hon Jim Anderton as Associate Minister for Tertiary Education with a specific responsibility for skill shortages.

"Dr Cullen's appointment demonstrates a renewed emphasis on ensuring the Government receives value for money from its tertiary education spend. It also highlights the importance of a well functioning tertiary education system in increasing skills, productivity and growth", said John Meeuwsen Chair of the ITF.

"Jim Anderton's time in the Economic Development and Industry and Regional Development portfolios has given him first hand experience of the skill shortages facing New Zealand industries.

In his closing speech to last year's Labour Conference, Dr Cullen stated that one of the key challenges facing the Government was that "in post-compulsory education we are still investing too much in courses of dubious worth and too little in areas such as trade and technical skills vital to our future".

"The critical issue is that all parts of the tertiary education sector need to contribute to meeting industries' skill needs. The ITF looks forward to working with Dr Michael Cullen and Jim Anderton to meet industries' skill needs", said John Meeuwsen.

ENDS

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