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Recognition Of ‘Dyslexia’ Not Broad Enough


Media Release
19TH April, 2007


Recognition Of ‘Dyslexia’ Good News For Some, But Not Broad Enough


Official recognition that many of our children have Dyslexia is a very positive step forward according to the Dore Achievement Centre.

“Accepting that dyslexia exists and that it can seriously inhibit learning is significant and welcome but it is grossly unfair to limit the focus to this single learning difficulty”, said Dore Achievement Centre, General Manager, David Conroy.

It’s widely believed as many as one in six (16%) people have a learning difficulty.

The Dore Achievement Centre has spent millions on research and development in this area since its inception in the UK 8 years ago.

“The more we have looked into learning difficulties the more muddy the labels become. Some people exhibit classic symptoms yet many have a random grouping of seemingly unrelated symptoms, which consequently go undiagnosed and untreated just because they can’t be given a specific label”.

New research shows 75% of dyslexics also have symptoms of ADHD, Dyspraxia or both.

“Rather than recognizing Dyslexia exclusively the official recognition should be of all learning difficulties, training for teachers should include assisting children with focus, attention, hyperactivity and co-ordination problems too”.

“The Government needs to focus the funding on addressing the root cause rather than the symptoms, thereby increasing children’s ability to learn. Without that for many sufferers the information will continue to go in and straight out again… the hole can’t be plugged until the brain is retrained”.

“Overall, we welcome the Government’s announcement and the invitation to work with them in helping these often very bright children have a positive and successful future”.


Dore Programme Science


The Dore Achievement Centre has a clinic in Auckland and is due to open in Wellington and Christchurch later this year.

The drug free programme was developed in Britain 8 years ago by a medical team that focused research on the cerebellum - the lower part of the brain.

The cerebellum is responsible for integrating
sensory information such as co-ordination,
fine motor skills, attention and
learning new skills - such as reading.

The drug free programme developed byDore
uses individually prescribed eye, balance
and sensory exercises designed to stimulate
the cerebellum, creating additional neural
pathways and making tasks automatic.


ends


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