Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Dyslexia Foundation and Ministry plan next steps

DFNZ media release 29 April 2007

Dyslexia Foundation and Education Ministry plan next steps

Talks have begun between the Dyslexia Foundation of New Zealand and the Ministry of Education on ways to support dyslexic students.

The Ministry announced last week it recognised some students experienced persistent difficulties learning to read and write, including those identified as dyslexic.

The Ministry said it was committed to targeting support to students with serious reading and writing problems.

The Dyslexia Foundation has invited its members and other dyslexia stakeholders to communicate their ideas on the best way forward, before a meeting with Ministry Deputy Secretary, Schooling Anne Jackson, and her team during May.

Dyslexia Foundation Trustee chair, Guy Pope-Mayell, said the Foundation and the Ministry saw June to November this year as a key period to work with other stakeholders on strategy, definition, scope and potential initiatives, with a specific focus on teacher training.

The aim was that an announcement on outcomes from this collaboration would be made this December.

Mr Pope-Mayell said an agreed Professional Development Plan could be rolled out next year which included a five year strategy pinpointing specific classroom initiatives.
New Zealand had the opportunity to utilise classroom international best practice to remove disadvantages dyslexic children presently experienced.

“The implications of these initiatives for the over 70,000 children who struggle daily with dyslexia is life changing, for them, their future education, and for their families,” Mr Pope-Mayell said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: Roddy Doyle's Grim and Gritty Rosie

Although it was completed over two years ago, Roddy Doyle's first original screenplay in over eighteen years has only just arrived in New Zealand. It's been well worth the wait. More>>

Simon Nathan: No Ordinary In-Laws

The title of this short memoir by Keith Ovenden is misleading – it would be better called “Bill, Shirley and me” as it is an account of Ovenden’s memories of his parents-in-law, Bill Sutch and Shirley Smith. His presence is pervasive through the book. All three participants are (or were) eloquent, strongly-opinionated intellectuals who have made significant contributions to different aspects of New Zealand life. Their interactions were often complex and difficult... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland