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Skills and training critical to economic performance

Skills and training critical to sustained economic performance

Apprenticeships and vocational education should be viewed as a normal career pathway for many more young people, and a key way for businesses to recruit and develop their talent pipeline.

This is one of the key messages the UK Commission for Employment and Skills’ Chief Executive, Michael Davis, will deliver in Wellington next week.

Speaking at the New Zealand Vocational Education and Training Research Forum, Mr Davis will outline how enhancing economic performance must be driven by the skills and talents of people. Drawing from the Commission’s recent Growth through People report, Mr Davis will outline five key priorities for action. These include linking improved workplace productivity to increased pay and prosperity, and better connecting educators and employers to better prepare people for work.

These recommendations will resonate with the experiences of New Zealand businesses and educators. The vision for education and training described by Mr Davis is based on the need to equip both people and businesses with the right skills to achieve success in personal and economic terms.

The UK Commission for Employment and Skills is a publicly-funded, industry-led organisation that offers guidance on skills and employment issues in the United Kingdom. Mr Davis’ visit is jointly hosted by the Industry Training Federation and Ako Aotearoa, New Zealand’s National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence.

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“UKCES’ priorities strongly align with our Centre’s mission and vision of the best possible outcome for all learners,” said Dr Peter Coolbear, Director of Ako Aotearoa – the National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence.
“Not only do these priorities demonstrate the importance of good quality vocational education, but the recommendations provide guidance that can enhance all forms of tertiary education, for the benefit of learners, businesses and society.”

ENDS

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