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PM’s Award for inclusive education is a win for all children

PM’s Award for inclusive education is a win for all children


15 November 2017

IHC says an award for inclusive teaching practices celebrates one of the fundamentals of education – that every child has a right to achieve.

The 2018 Prime Ministers Education Excellence Awards is rewarding inclusive practices with the Education Focus Prize – Takatū Prize.

IHC has fought for nearly 70 years for people with intellectual disabilities and autism to be included in their communities – and that starts as young children and at school.

“Inclusive education is a vital building block for everyone feeling part of their community,” says IHC Director of Advocacy, Trish Grant. “We’ve stepped up our fight since 2008 with the Education Complaint calling for all children with disabilities to have discrimination free access to education.

“Many schools and teachers, although they want to become more inclusive, are unsure of how to do this. Profiling the best inclusive practices and celebrating success will increase knowledge, capability and capacity in other schools.”

This award upholds the new Government’s pledge for equality in New Zealand.

“The announcement of the Takatū Prize is very timely given the new Government’s commitment to reducing inequality and improving wellbeing for all New Zealanders,” says Trish. “We hope the award will help bring about real change in New Zealand’s education system for children and young people with intellectual disabilities and autism.”

IHC salutes the many schools and teachers already making a big difference to children and young people throughout the country and encourages nominations that support great educators.

ENDS

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