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Free state education a step closer with NCEA changes

The kiwi ideal of free state education is a step closer with the announcement that NCEA will be free of charge to students, while the overall emphasis on making NCEA more accessible and easier to understand, begins to place students back at the centre of the education system.

This is worth celebrating in itself, but also as a signal that the system priorities are shifting back towards student experiences and outcomes in practical ways, not just on paper.

Ensuring equal status for Mātauranga Māori - understanding of Māori knowledge - is another important dimension of the proposed changes and fits well with the other proposals for bringing the NCEA qualifications up to speeds for the 21st century.

"The changes announced today are a welcome dose of common sense. We’re feeling really encouraged by the focus on making it easier for all students to understand and get access to NCEA qualifications, says NZSTA President Lorraine Kerr.

"It’s hard to see how anyone could argue with these proposals. NZSTA is looking forward to seeing how the detailed design work comes together over the next few months, and we’ll be looking to make sure that it delivers on the intent that’s outlined here."


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