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Wahine tauira numbers in trade training exceed expectations

17 June 2019

Wahine tauira numbers in UCOL trade training exceed expectations



Kelly Johnston, UCOL’s Kaituhono Mahi Work Broker


A growing number of wahine (women) are taking part in Te Mataroa – Māori and Pasifika Trades Training (MPTT) across UCOL campuses in Manawatū, Horowhenua, Wairarapa and Whanganui, including Taumarunui.

The first milestone progress report for 2019, covering the first quarter of 2019, has wahine tauira participation levels at just over 44% – well above the 40% target.

Teina Mataira, Pouārahi Māori and Pacific Peoples Education Group at UCOL, said his team had worked hard to lift the participation of wahine in trades.

“We have exceeded our targets, and while each trade is still dominated according to sex it is pleasing to see overall numbers are beginning to even out,” Mr Mataira said.

“We are not too far away from overall parity in numbers, but it will be some time to come before this is reflected in each course.”

In all, 38 wahine tauira are currently enrolled in the four MPTT programmes, making up:

• 20% of our Automotive tairua

• 20% of our Construction tairua

• 90% of our Health Science tairua

• 80% of our Hospitality tairua.

Kelly Johnston, Kaituhono Mahi Work Broker, said the results were well above 2018 and were a direct result of the success of Te Mataora.

“We provide a whānau-based support to all of our tauira. We help connect them to their heritage and culture while providing a safe space from which to learn and develop their skills,” said Ms Johnston.

“We introduce them to potential employers, and we work with them for six months after the course ends. For many it’s their first real experience of mahi – and having someone to talk to can make all the difference.”

ENDS


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