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Armstrong Jones encourages youth input

Media Release
Armstrong Jones

Monday 4 October 1999

Armstrong Jones encourages youth input

Business and schools are combining forces to provide a fresh approach to the issue of retirement income provision.
Financial services company, Armstrong Jones is the sponsor of the Super 2000 Taskforce Schools’ Competition, launched today.
The competition has been designed to involve secondary school students in the search for a long-term framework for retirement income policy. Students will look at demographic, economic and community influences, in order to complete a formal proposal by July 2000.
Armstrong Jones managing director Paul Fyfe believes this is an ideal issue for students to tackle, since it is one that will affect each of them directly in future years.
“While a growing number of people today accept the need to make personal provision, the question of how to manage a government-funded system that ensures equality and security for all superannuitants is still an extreme priority.
“In searching for the long-term solution, it is vital all New Zealanders’ views are considered,” says Mr Fyfe. “This competition gives our younger generation just such an opportunity.”
A total prize package of $42,000 will be shared by the winning students and their schools, across a number of categories.
Armstrong Jones provides a range of unit trusts and manages two of New Zealand’s most successful superannuation funds.
The company has received the Morningstar/Business Herald New Zealand Fund Manager of the Year award for six consecutive years from 1993 to 1998 and, in recognition of these achievements, has also been named Fund Manager of the Decade.
ENDS

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