Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Students demand no fees

Press Release
For Immediate Use

Thursday, October 14, 1999

Students demand no fees

Over 2500 students at the University of Auckland today signed a petition demanding no fee increases for 2000 and condemning the University Council for the eviction of student occupiers in a dawn raid on Wednesday.

"Clearly, there is widespread concern on campus about possible fee increases for 2000. The government and university must take note of this. Students simply can not afford a further fee increase," said Kane Forbes, protest spokesperson.

These sentiments were also expressed at a Auckland University Medical Students forum at noon. 400 students holding banners reading "Increased fees = less GPs" and "Our debt today cripples society tomorrow" were joined by doctors, nurses and representatives from the New Zealand Medical Association (NZMA) to hear politcians from Act, National, Labour and the Alliance outline their tertiary policies. Act and National candidates were extensively heckled and booed by the students.

"Increasing fees are obviously a concern for medical students. Their fees have gone from approximately $3000 in 1998 to a predicted $10,000 for 2000. It is not surprising that many doctors graduating with huge loans are leaving the country after graduation to escape their loans," continued Kane Forbes.

Students are vowing to continue the fight against the government and University Council. A rally is planned in the Student Union Quad at 1pm on Friday. "We will not give up until the governement takes concrete steps to address the crisis in the tertiary sector," concluded Kane Forbes.

Contacts:

Eva Neitzert 021 665 139

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: Roddy Doyle's Grim and Gritty Rosie

Although it was completed over two years ago, Roddy Doyle's first original screenplay in over eighteen years has only just arrived in New Zealand. It's been well worth the wait. More>>

Simon Nathan: No Ordinary In-Laws

The title of this short memoir by Keith Ovenden is misleading – it would be better called “Bill, Shirley and me” as it is an account of Ovenden’s memories of his parents-in-law, Bill Sutch and Shirley Smith. His presence is pervasive through the book. All three participants are (or were) eloquent, strongly-opinionated intellectuals who have made significant contributions to different aspects of New Zealand life. Their interactions were often complex and difficult... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland