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Preliminary Results From The Blind Week Appeal

As of 8 November, the Royal New Zealand Foundation for the Blind has raised just over half a million dollars for Blind Week 2000.

"At the moment there are still several regions where money is being lodged and processed with the bank on a daily basis," says Carol White, Marketing Operations Manager.

"We expect to get more accurate figures in the next few weeks, but we are not closing off Blind Week donations until after the 30 November as there are some events around the country that have yet to run."

The Foundation would like to thank the more than 15,000 volunteers that helped collect for the Blind Week Appeal. "A national appeal is a huge logistical exercise and we couldn't do it without community support from schools, Lions, Rotary, church groups and many others," says Ms White.

"We also realise there are people who missed our collectors knocking on their door and are still interested in donating to the appeal," says Ms White. "They can post their Blind Week envelopes to us at the address on the envelope - we welcome their contributions."

Those that did not receive an envelope or misplaced it can still give by posting donations to their local Foundation office, phoning through on 0800 272 4553 or donating online at http://www.rnzfb.org.nz/donations.html"

-ends-

For further information, please contact Catherine Hennessy, Communications Co-ordinator, RNZFB
on Ph: (09) 355-6884 or 021-687-426.

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