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NZ Collectors For Australian RP Society

Media Release From The Royal New Zealand Foundation For The
Blind
-----------------------------------------------------------

"Collections for the Retinitis Pigmentosa Society of Western Australia will not benefit all blind and sight impaired New Zealanders. Not everyone has this condition and only a small percentage of people go blind from retinitis pigmentosa," says chairman of the Board for the Royal New Zealand Foundation
for the Blind, Gordon Sanderson.

In saying that, he is refuting the claim by the Western Australian charity that the money it raises will benefit all blind people. He is also disturbed to hear that collectors are raising money in New Zealand for an Australian organisation.

"The Foundation has just completed its major fundraising campaign through Blind Week. Some of the money we raise through donations goes to the New Zealand consumer organisation Retina New Zealand, which is a support group for people with retinitis pigmentosa. Any activity in New Zealand by anyone other than the New Zealand based organisation is undermining the work of this local group," he says.

Gordon Sanderson regrets that the Foundation is unable to spend more money on research because all of the money it raises through its appeals has to be used to fund rehabilitation services.

"We would love to be in a position to spend more on research on all causes of blindness but because government refuses to adequately fund the Foundation's rehabilitation services we can't afford to."

ENDS

For more information contact:
Gordon Sanderson, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Royal
New Zealand Foundation for the Blind. Mob. 025 513 097

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