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Rejection Of Marine Farm Development

Rejection Of Marine Farm Development - A Community Win

One of the major objectors to a marine farm development proposal in Akaroa Harbour says the rejection of the application is an example of what community¹s can achieve when they work together.

The Banks Peninsula District Council spent more than $13 000 fighting an application by Ngai Tahu Fisheries and Kuku Enterprises for consent to develop nine separate mussel farms covering about 60ha in the harbour.

"The Council had budgeted to spend up to $20 000 if necessary to protect the harbour area from this proposal. We were given a clear mandate from the community that this development was not acceptable," says Mayor Noeline Allan.

"At the time, there wasn¹t an overall coastal management plan and there is not enough scientific evidence about the potential impacts of such a venture. This development would have prevented others using what is a public area and in addition, it would have hurt out valuable tourism industry. There would have also been a visual impact on the harbour area."

"The tourism industry contributes $27.5 million to the local economy each year and that must be given serious consideration."

"It is a case of balancing economic, social and environmental issues. The Council worked with local residents and other organisations such as Forest and Bird and the decision shows what can be achieved when we work together for the benefit of the Peninsula."

Ends


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