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Watch for kids on Walk to School Day - LTSA


For immediate Release 7 November 2001

Watch for kids on Walk to School Day - LTSA

The Land Transport Safety Authority is asking drivers to be extra vigilant this Friday as kids across the country gear up for New Zealand's first National Walk to School Day.

"Children will be out on the footpaths in force, and we're asking drivers to be aware of that and do their part to ensure that Walk to School Day is a success. That means keeping your eyes open and your speed down, and paying very close attention at pedestrian crossings and areas around schools," said Director of Land Transport Safety David Wright.

Many of the children taking part in Walk to School Day will be part of a 'walking school bus'. At least one adult 'driver' supervises each walking bus, collecting and dropping off child 'passengers' at designated stops. Reflective clothing, bright flags, bag tags or sashes will help to identify the walking buses.

Walking school buses have proven successful in reducing the volume of traffic around schools overseas, and the idea is catching on in New Zealand with buses on the go in Nelson, Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland, Hamilton and elsewhere.

"Getting kids walking has all sorts of health benefits, and fewer parents driving children should mean less traffic around schools. As more and more walking school buses get underway it becomes even more important that drivers slow down and stay focussed on city streets," Mr Wright said.

For more information, please contact:

Andy Knackstedt - LTSA Media Manager

Ph 04 494 8751


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