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Farmers Makes A Difference

Farmers Makes A Difference

The Salvation Army today received their single biggest donation for the year - a cheque for $266,309.00 from retail chain, Farmers.

Farmers Chief Executive, Nick Lowe was delighted to be making a sizeable donation to such a worthy cause.

“Christmas may be the season for giving, but it also highlights the hardships faced by an increasing number of New Zealanders. We wanted to make a significant contribution to a charity that offers those people a second chance. Through a variety of social service programmes, The Salvation Army makes a difference 365 days of the year. We were very pleased to support the great work they do, “ Mr Lowe said.

The money was raised during a recent charity promotion, “Make a Difference Day”, whereby profit from a day’s trading was earmarked for The Salvation Army. When presenting the cheque, Mr Lowe thanked Farmers customers for supporting the promotion and The Salvation Army.

“There is no doubt that our customers were delighted to support The Salvation Army. And, we’d like to thank them for ensuring Farmers’ donation could be substantial,” Mr Lowe said.

The Salvation Army Public Relations Officer, Lt. Colonel Don Oliver says the money will be distributed nationwide to assist with community-based services.

“Farmers generous donation will help us to provide thousands of New Zealanders with assistance over the Christmas period. We envisage supplying in excess of 5000 food hampers and several thousand Christmas dinners, not to mention the hundreds of hours spent counselling those who are struggling to survive the festive season,” Lt. Colonel Oliver said.

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