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Algal Bloom Warning For Lake Tutira Continues

MEDIA RELEASE
30 December 2005

Algal Bloom Warning For Lake Tutira Continues

Hawke’s Bay District Health Board’s Public Health Unit has re-issued a health warning following the discovery of cyanobacteria algal blooms in Lake Tutira, north of Napier last week.

Samples taken by Hawke's Bay Regional Council on Wednesday 28th December show that two potentially toxic species cyanobacteria are present. Exposure to cyanobacteria and its toxins can have health effects, including severe skin rashes and stomach upsets, and can spark hay fever and asthma attacks.

Medical Officer of Health Dr Lester Calder, said people should not swim in Lake Tutira, or undertake any other recreational activities which would involve significant contact with the lake water.

Dog owners should also keep their dogs away from contact with the lake water.

It is important the water is not used for drinking or cooking purposes.

“If you think you may have been in contact with the bloom and experience any of the symptoms (i.e. severe skin rash, stomach upset, hay fever or asthma attack) you should contact a doctor,” Dr Calder said. There is no specific treatment other than managing the symptoms.

Monitoring of the situation will continue over the holiday period, and signs have been erected at Lake Tutira.

To get the latest information ring the Public Health Unit "Safe Swimming Line" on phone (06) 878 1368.

END

WHAT ARE CYANOBACTERIA?
Cyanobacteria are an ancient group of organisms with characteristics in common with both bacteria and algae. In certain environmental and hydrological conditions, plankton (free-floating) cyanobacteria cells can multiply and form what are known as algal blooms. Cyanobacteria can also grow in bottom substrates forming mats, which can sometimes detach and float to the surface. Some cyanobacteria species produce toxins (cyanotoxins), which pose a risk to humans and animals when consumed in drinking water or by direct contact during recreational activities.

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