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Drug-Free Treatment Centre for Dyslexia, ADHD Open

Drug-Free Treatment Centre for Dyslexia & ADHD Now Open for Families in Lower North & Upper South Islands

A drug-free treatment clinic for people suffering from learning difficulties has opened in Wellington.

The first Dore Centre was established 8 years ago in England, there are clinics all over the world. Almost 20,000 people have successfully completed the programme.

Toyah Wilcox and Welsh Rugby Legend, Scott Quinnell are two British celebrities who have completed the Dore Programme after privately struggling with learning difficulties since childhood.

The Wellington Clinic is centrally located at Level One, 220 Thorndon Quay (above Bordeaux Bakery).

“We have deliberately chosen a location that was close to the railway station and ferry terminal to make it easier for families travelling from places around the Lower North Island and Upper South Island. People on the programme need to be assessed at the Clinic every 6 weeks, so location has been a big consideration for us in Wellington”, said NZ Dore Centre General Manager, David Conroy.

A South Island centre is due to open in Christchurch in early October.

Each person is assessed by Dore Centre clinicians and given their own individualised exercise programme that is designed specifically to enhance and train the areas of their cerebellum that are underdeveloped.

The cerebellum is the part of the brain responsible for integrating sensory information such as co-ordination, fine motor skills, attention and learning new skills such as reading.

People who want an initial assessment that will indicate the likelihood of a learning difficulty can do a free test online, www.dore.co.nz

Children can answer the questions themselves or a parent can take the test for them.


ENDS

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