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Health advice for RWC visitors just a phone call away

Health advice for RWC visitors just a phone call away

8 September 2011

While an overdose of rugby is likely to be the only thing Rugby World Cup visitors will suffer from during their stay in New Zealand, they’re being reassured they can call Healthline if anything more serious crops up.

Overseas visitors can call Healthline free on 0800 611 116 from mobiles and most hotel rooms. The service is staffed 24/7 by registered nurses who can offer advice on any health matter and advise callers on what they should do.

Depending on a person’s symptoms, they may be encouraged to seek medical treatment or be given advice on how they can manage a condition or minor injury. Occasionally the nurse may call 111 for them.

Clinical Director, Dr Ian St George, says Healthline is geared up for the influx.

“We want to look after our overseas guests and let them know that if they become unwell while they are in New Zealand, free, quality health advice is just a phone call away.”

Dr St George says ‘over-indulgence’ and injuries can occur during festive events and Northern hemisphere visitors may also fall victim to winter influenza strains still circulating in the community.

“Becoming unwell when you’re away from home is no fun so we want people to know they’re not alone. Healthline should be the first port of call for visitors needing health advice. Our nurses are trained to assess the situation rapidly and advise callers on what they should do.”

The Ministry of Health is also making information available for overseas visitors, including guidelines on eligibility for publicly funded health and disability services in New Zealand. More about this can be found at http://www.moh.govt.nz/eligibility.

ENDS


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