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Men’s Health Stats Still a Concern in NZ

June 7, 2012

Men’s Health Stats Still a Concern in NZ

June 11-17, 2012 is Men’s Health Week – What's Your Score?

Latest statistics released in 2012 show that on average one New Zealand man dies every three hours of a preventable illness. Death rates for Maori also remain double that of non-Maori.

Men’s Health Week (June 11-17) is calling attention to the concerning statistics surrounding men’s health in New Zealand. The campaign encourages Kiwi men take charge of their health for both themselves and their families.

Prevention is always better than cure, but too many Kiwi blokes are putting their health on the backburner until there is a more serious problem.

Medical doctor and New Zealand men’s health researcher, Dr. Lannes Johnson said: “Men’s Health Week reminds us that we as men need to be aware of what our bodies are telling us and also perhaps not telling us, as sometimes there can be some underlying sinister issues that men don’t know about until it may be too late. That’s why it is so important men get proactive about their health by getting a check-up.”

“Men in New Zealand live on average four years less than women, yet are much less likely to talk to a GP about their health. We need to be turning around these statistics and ensuring our Kiwi men are able to live long, fulfilling and healthy lives.”

Men can use this week as an opportunity to see their local healthcare professional for a check-up. Men’s Health Pit Stop health checks are also being offered for free at Amcal, Unichem, Care Chemist, Radius and Life Pharmacies throughout New Zealand.

Kiwi men are also invited to take a quick online health check to give them a snapshot of their potential health risks. The ‘What’s Your Score?’ online survey at www.menshealthweek.co.nz gives an indication of what might need to be checked with their GP.

“By encouraging men to start taking small simple steps towards addressing health concerns for their age, such as getting cholesterol and relevant blood tests, testicular and prostate cancer checks as well as maintaining a healthy diet and exercising regularly, we should start to see an improvement in men’s health statistics overall,” said Dr. Johnson.

This year Men’s Health Week is also supported by a number of great ambassadors including, Dr. Tom Mulholland, Rene Naufahu, Benson Stanley, Mike King, Bull Allen and many more.

The Facts:
• On average one New Zealand man dies every three hours of a preventable illness, with death rates for Maori men double that of non-Maori (Statistics NZ)
• NZ Men live on average 4 years less than women, and yet still remain much less likely to talk to a GP about their health
• 6 out of 10 New Zealand males are overweight
• Nearly a quarter of New Zealand men smoke
• 27% of men have potentially hazardous drinking patterns
• Maori men are twice as likely to die prematurely as non-Maori men, with heart disease, cancer and type two diabetes being the main causes
• Maori men have the lowest life expectancy of any of the major population groups in New Zealand
• Maori men are nearly twice as likely to be obese than non-Maori
• 1 in 8 New Zealand men will experience serious depression during their lifetime
• In New Zealand the suicide rate for men is 3 times that of women
• Latest research shows that men are at greater risk of stroke than women, with stroke being the second biggest single cause of death and the largest cause of disability in adults in New Zealand

Men’s Health Week, June 11-17, 2012. What’s your score?

ENDS

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