News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Eight glasses a day keeps the doctor away

Eight glasses a day keeps the doctor away

19 October 2015

How many glasses of water do you drink a day? Not enough according to a new survey which found 54% of New Zealander’s are drinking less than half of the recommended eight glasses.

The second HRV State of Home Survey, conducted by independent research company Buzz Channel, found on average New Zealanders drink around four glasses of water per day.

The commonly held recommendation for fluid intake, including that of the Ministry of Health, is around eight glasses each day, which can also include soft drinks, tea and coffee, and milk. However, various studies suggest certain fluids such as coffee also dehydrate a person.

The State of Home survey found 10% of people drink one glass of water or less per day. On the flip side, those aged 18-34 years old drank the most water with an average of 5 glasses being downed during the day.

Peoples’ attitudes to water quality in New Zealand were also surveyed with one in five people concerned about the quality of the water in their home. This concern is highest when people consider the purity of water in households, with more than 10% saying the purity of their water is ‘not good’ or ‘terrible’.

Those on low incomes, living in rental properties, and Maori are most concerned about water quality and Aucklanders felt their water tasted and smelled worse than those in other areas.

Bruce Gordon, CEO of HRV, says one of the reasons people don't drink as much water as they should is because it tastes bad.

“You can't help but think it's also because they are wary of the quality of the water that’s coming into their home too.”

He says although New Zealand has a great water quality record, it’s not the case in every area.

“The results of the survey reflect this because it’s clear many people are concerned about the quality of their water and what’s in the water that they are drinking and bathing in every day.

“More needs to be done to ensure every New Zealander has access to clean and pure water and that’s the reason HRV started the Water In Schools Project this year. It’s a great little project where water filters are installed at schools in areas with water quality issues which means the water these kids are drinking is clean and pure.

“Not only is it about doing something good – and healthy – for schools, but at the same time it helps raise awareness about water quality in New Zealand.”

The water filters are designed to filter the whole water supply connected to a home, school or workplace, which removes heavy metals and up to 98% of chlorine, as well as other contaminants and water born nasties such as giardia.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: 1917's 1,000 Yard Stare

Sam Mendes has created a terrible and barbarous trek, one that we appreciate all the more for being catapulted right into the midst of this ear-splitting melee from the film's opening sequence. More>>


Floorball: NZ To Host World Cup Of Floorball In 2022

In a major coup for a minnow nation in the European-dominated sport of floorball, New Zealand has won the rights to host one of the sport’s marque international events. More>>

National Voyage Continues: Tuia 250 Ends

Tuia 250 has unleashed an unstoppable desire to keep moving forward and continue the kōrero about who we are, say the co-chairs of the Tuia 250 National Coordinating Committee, Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr. More>>

ALSO:

Te Papa: New Chief Executive From Its Own Staff

Courtney Johnston has been appointed as the new Chief Executive of Te Papa. Ms Johnston will take up the role in December 2019. Since its founding, Te Papa has had a dual leadership model, and as Tumu Whakarae|Chief Executive, Johnston will share the leadership with Kaihautū Dr Arapata Hakiwai. More>>

ALSO:

Over 150 Productions: NZ Fringe 2020 Has Launched

The upcoming festival will be held at 40 venues all over Wellington Region from 28 February to 21 March, and includes every genre possible—theatre, comedy, dance, music, clowning, cabaret, visual art, children’s shows and more! More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland