News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Housing, health and wellbeing

What people think about housing impacts their health and wellbeing

Public Health Association media release, 2 October 2017

Most see a relationship between housing and health, but recent New Zealand research suggests how we feel about our housing is also important, the Public Health Association Conference was told in Christchurch today.

Mrs Lindsay Lowe of Toi Te Ora Health Service in Tauranga, and co-author of the report, said the research showed that the meanings people put on housing and how they interpret what they experience is a significant factor for their wellbeing.

Information was gathered about the differing housing conditions people living in the Bay of Plenty and Lakes districts experience. This included issues like how connected they felt to their neighbourhood or community, and the location and physical quality of the house.

“These insights help us better understand that housing not being an anonymous stock of dwellings, but as something more meaningful to residents.

Data was collected from in-depth interviews with people from a range of backgrounds and housing circumstances. Analysis identified key themes that would affect how a person feels about their housing. These included cold, damp and overcrowded conditions.

“Vulnerability and insecurity about renting was a recurrent theme,” Mrs Lowe said.

“Renters often described feelings of not being in control and being dependent on the decisions of landlords about rent increases or whether their lease will be renewed. This security is particularly important for young children as it provides a stable living environment.

“Having to move often may have a negative effect on children’s education attainment and access to health care.”

On a positive note she said good quality housing was found to have a protective effect on health and wellbeing.

This research will be used to inform the Toi Te Ora housing strategy and to support working for better housing and health outcomes. A recommendation in the report is to make available culturally appropriate information to empower whanau to keep their homes warmer and drier and reduce the harmful health impacts of overcrowding.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: 1917's 1,000 Yard Stare

Sam Mendes has created a terrible and barbarous trek, one that we appreciate all the more for being catapulted right into the midst of this ear-splitting melee from the film's opening sequence. More>>


Floorball: NZ To Host World Cup Of Floorball In 2022

In a major coup for a minnow nation in the European-dominated sport of floorball, New Zealand has won the rights to host one of the sport’s marque international events. More>>

National Voyage Continues: Tuia 250 Ends

Tuia 250 has unleashed an unstoppable desire to keep moving forward and continue the kōrero about who we are, say the co-chairs of the Tuia 250 National Coordinating Committee, Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr. More>>

ALSO:

Te Papa: New Chief Executive From Its Own Staff

Courtney Johnston has been appointed as the new Chief Executive of Te Papa. Ms Johnston will take up the role in December 2019. Since its founding, Te Papa has had a dual leadership model, and as Tumu Whakarae|Chief Executive, Johnston will share the leadership with Kaihautū Dr Arapata Hakiwai. More>>

ALSO:

Over 150 Productions: NZ Fringe 2020 Has Launched

The upcoming festival will be held at 40 venues all over Wellington Region from 28 February to 21 March, and includes every genre possible—theatre, comedy, dance, music, clowning, cabaret, visual art, children’s shows and more! More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland